Film Workflow Examples

The following sections detail several Cinema Tools database workflow scenarios. Keep in mind that there are many possible variations of these workflows, and you often do not have to follow the steps exactly in order. It’s also possible to use parts of several workflows. See Basic Film Workflow Steps for details about specific steps. For a discussion of the integration between Final Cut Pro and Cinema Tools, see How Much Can Be Done from Final Cut Pro?

Following are sections covering two groups of workflows—those that use scene-and-take transfers (If You Used Scene-and-Take Transfers) and those that use camera-roll transfers (If You Used Camera-Roll Transfers). These workflows are further divided depending on whether a telecine log is available and whether you have device control of your video player during the capture process.

If You Used Scene-and-Take Transfers

Because scene-and-take transfers require a database record for each take (because of noncontinuous key numbers), an important first consideration is whether or not a telecine log is available.

Workflow for a Scene-and-Take Transfer with a Telecine Log

Importing a telecine log automatically creates the database entries.

Figure. Diagram showing film workflow options for a scene-and-take transfer with a telecine log.

Workflow for a Scene-and-Take Transfer Without a Telecine Log

With no telecine log to import, you can do either of the following:

  • Manually add entries to the database for each clip: With this workflow (outlined in the following diagram), you export a batch capture list with Cinema Tools. If you have device control and you already know the In and Out points of the clips, this method can be efficient.
  • Manually capture the clips with Final Cut Pro and use the Synchronize with Cinema Tools command to create the Cinema Tools database: This workflow is most useful when you don’t know the exact In and Out points for each clip or if you do not have device control. You can also create the Cinema Tools database by dragging the folder containing the clips to the Cinema Tools application icon. You can use the Identify feature of Cinema Tools to determine and enter the key number information for each database record.
    Figure. Diagram showing film workflow options for a scene-and-take transfer without a telecine log.

If You Used Camera-Roll Transfers

The primary consideration when using camera-roll transfers is the film list generation method you intend to use. See How Cinema Tools Creates Film Lists for an explanation of the two available methods. Make sure to sync the audio to the video before you capture the clips.

Clip-Based Workflow for a Camera-Roll Transfer

The clip-based method is more reliable because there are fewer variables.

Figure. Diagram showing film workflow options for a camera-roll transfer using the clip-based method.

Timecode-Based Workflow for a Camera-Roll Transfer

The timecode-based method must be used in certain situations, such as when generating a list from an external EDL or when the clip files are offline.

Figure. Diagram showing film workflow options for a camera-roll transfer using the timecode-based method.