Settings in the Find Dialog

The settings in the Find dialog make it easy to find specific records based on their Scene and Take values.

Figure. Find dialog.

The Find dialog contains the following settings:

  • Scene and Take: The values you enter in the Scene and Take fields depend on what you want to do:
    • To find all the records in the open database: Leave the Scene and Take fields blank and click Show All Records.
    • To find all the records for a particular scene or shot: Enter the identifier for that scene or shot in the Scene field, leave the Take field blank, then click the Find Records button. (The Take field is disabled unless you select the “Show only exact matches” checkbox.) For example, if you enter “1” in the Scene field and then click Find Records, Cinema Tools finds all records associated with scene 1, including the shots 1, 1A, 1B, 1C, and so on. If you enter “1A” in the Scene field, only the records for shot 1A are found.
    • To find the record for a specific scene and take: Select “Show only exact matches,” enter the scene and take identifiers in the Scene and Take fields, then click Find Records.

    See Scene, Shot, and Take Number Details for more information.

  • Show only exact matches: Select this checkbox to find a specific record that matches the Scene and Take field entries.

Scene, Shot, and Take Number Details

The way Cinema Tools interprets scene numbers can lead to unexpected results when using the Find dialog.

Cinema Tools looks at a scene number as having up to four parts:

  • Prefix: This is an optional set of one or more letters in front of the scene number, usually used to indicate a new, unique scene added to the script. For example, the “A” in scene A54C-3. Prefixes don’t always indicate unique scenes, however—the actual letters used in the prefix control how they affect using the Find dialog. Prefixes using the letters A, B, C, and D are treated as indicating unique scenes. Prefixes using any of the other letters are not treated as indicating unique scenes.
  • Scene number: This is the first set of numbers. Depending on the prefix, it might be the entire scene number, although with some prefixes (A,B, C, or D), the prefix becomes part of the scene number. For example, in the A54C-3 example the scene is “A54.” In the example E54C-3, the scene is “54.”
  • Suffix: This is a set of one or more letters after the scene number, indicating the shot for the scene. For example, the “C” in scene A54C-3.
  • Take number: This is the number after the suffix (shot indicator) that identifies a specific take. Usually it is preceded by a hyphen (which you don’t enter in the Find dialog). For example, the “3” in scene A54C-3.

The tricky part is determining whether the prefix indicates a unique scene or not. Prefixes using letters from A to D are treated as referring to unique scenes. Prefixes using letters from E to Z are treated as being modifiers to the scene number, but not unique scenes.

For example, if you use the Find dialog to search for scene 54, it will find 54, G54, and K54 (all are considered to be scene 54) but will not find A54, B54, C54, or D54 (which are all considered to be different scenes from scene 54).

Suffixes indicate shots that are part of the scene. If you search for scene 54, you will find all shots for scene 54, such as 54A and 54F, but not B54A, because the prefix makes this a different scene.

Take numbers are related to specific shots, which in turn are related to specific scenes. If you search for scene 54, you will find all shots and takes for that scene.

If you enter “54A” in the Find dialog’s Scene field, you will find only those records for shot A of scene 54; you will not find records for scene 54B.

Entering a number in the Take field will find only shots using that take. For example, entering “54A” in the Scene field and “3” in the Take field will find only record 54A-3. Entering “54” in the Scene field (with no shot specified) and “3” in the Take field will find any records for scene 54 that have a take 3, such as 54A-3 and 54D-3.