Ingest Methods Based on Media Type

The type of acquisition format you work with determines the ingest method used by the specific Final Cut Studio application. Most tape-based or tapeless acquisition formats must be captured or transferred using Final Cut Pro. Other formats, including QuickTime media, still-image files, and audio files, can be imported directly into any of the Final Cut Studio applications that are capable of using them.

The following ingest methods are described here:

For more information about the formats covered in the above sections, see Professional Formats and Workflows, available in Final Cut Pro Help.

Ingesting Tapeless Media

Tapeless media formats (also called file-based formats) are increasingly popular for acquisition, and, in fact, most new video and digital cinema formats being introduced are tapeless. Tapeless acquisition usually requires the Log and Transfer window in Final Cut Pro; some formats that aren’t supported directly by Final Cut Pro can be converted to a supported QuickTime format using a third-party utility.

Popular Formats

Popular tapeless formats that Final Cut Studio is compatible with include P2, AVCHD, AVC-Intra, IMX, XDCAM, XDCAM HD, XDCAM EX, and REDCODE (which requires additional third-party software).

Method of Ingest

All tapeless formats are ingested using the Log and Transfer window in Final Cut Pro. The media you want to ingest needs to be on a mounted storage device prior to transfer.

Clip Organization

Before you begin the transfer process, you need to decide what media you want to archive for the long term (preferably by backing it up in two separate places). It’s usually wise to archive everything that was originally shot, and it’s critical to preserve the original directory structure of each set of media that you copy from the camera’s recording media.

During the log and transfer process, you have several options for organizing your media. You can choose specific source media to ingest and add logging information, including clip name, scene number, shot/take number, camera angle, log notes, and a “good” flag that you can use to indicate preferred selects.

Tracking and Organizational Information

The most important piece of organizational metadata that Final Cut Pro uses for ingested tapeless media is a Universally Unique Identifier (UUID). Every clip that’s ingested from a tapeless media format is assigned a UUID number that, along with each clip’s timecode track, maintains the correspondence between the ingested clip and the original source media file it was derived from.

Additional camera-specific metadata may also be available, depending on the format. Usually proprietary metadata can be accessed only by using third-party utilities. Consult your camera’s documentation for more information, if necessary.

Backup and Archiving Considerations

It’s critical to redundantly archive all of the source media, along with the original directory structure that was copied from the camera’s storage media. Hard disk backup to multiple volumes is a good short-term solution, and optical or tape data backup may be the most suitable long-term solution.

Common Offline/Online Strategies

Some formats, such as AVCHD, must be transcoded to another format (such as Apple ProRes) when ingested into Final Cut Pro. Others, like P2, XDCAM, and REDCODE, can be ingested natively. Native ingest usually involves embedding the native source media in a QuickTime wrapper. As a result, the media remains in its native format but appears to Final Cut Studio applications as a QuickTime file.

If you’re working with a low-bandwidth format, it may be simplest to ingest at full quality and then edit and finish at the same high quality.

Alternatively, you can transcode to an offline format during ingest. Because each tapeless clip’s UUID allows you to match each ingested offline clip to the original source media file, you can always reingest later at a higher quality for finishing.

Ingesting Tape-Based Media

Videotape capture is as basic as it gets, and Final Cut Pro is capable of ingesting virtually every videotape format using built-in or third-party video capture interfaces. Although tapeless formats are quickly taking over acquisition, tape-based formats still dominate the final process of high-end mastering.

Popular Formats

Popular SD formats include the analog Betacam SP format and the digital DV-25, DVCAM, DVCPRO, DVCPRO 50, Digital Betacam, and Betacam SX formats.

Popular HD formats include DVCPRO HD, HDCAM, HDCAM SR, and D-5.

Method of Ingest

All tape-based formats are ingested using the Log and Capture window in Final Cut Pro. Some formats, like DV-25, DVCPRO 50, and DVCPRO HD, can be captured directly via a FireWire interface. Others require the use of a third-party video capture interface for capture of composite, S-Video, component Y′PBPR, SDI, or HD-SDI video signals.

Clip Organization

Before you capture, you can create a batch capture list that specifies the reel number and timecode of each tape so that you can choose, in advance, which clips you want to capture. (See Import batch capture lists for more information.) Once you begin the log and capture process, there are two ways you can capture your media:

  • You can capture entire tapes of media at once, as long as you have enough storage space. You can then organize your media later, in the Browser.

  • Alternatively, you can selectively log the shots you want in advance, capturing only the media you know you want to use and saving hard disk space.

Tracking and Organizational Information

The three most critical pieces of metadata include the clip name you assign, the reel number that matches each clip to the source videotape, and the timecode track that identifies which range of media came from what part of the source videotape.

When using tape-based formats, metadata management is a manual process. Each videotape should be physically labeled with the reel name, and it’s important to make sure that each clip is logged with the correct reel number. Accurate timecode control is also critical.

Backup and Archiving Considerations

One of the nice things about videotape formats is that the source tapes are their own backup. Some producers also opt to clone the source tapes for offsite storage for an added level of security. If you do this, make sure the timecode is accurately cloned and the reel numbers are accurately and physically marked on each tape.

Common Offline/Online Strategies

In order to work quickly and save hard disk space, many editors capture media for the initial offline edit using a low-quality codec and then later recapture only the clips that were used in the edit using a high-quality online codec, in preparation for finishing and mastering.

If you’re worried you won’t have the time or budget to get access to the deck in the future, you can capture at online quality right from the start. This method is increasingly popular for highly compressed acquisition formats like DVCPRO HD. These formats have low bandwidth requirements, allowing for capture at the highest native quality of the source media, with little overhead, and giving you the freedom to work at this quality all the way through to mastering.

If you’re ingesting at online quality from the very beginning, but the resulting media is too bandwidth-intensive to conveniently edit on your particular system, you can use the Media Manager to create duplicate offline media with cloned timecode and reel names for offline editing.

Ingesting Film Transferred to Video

If you’re working on a project that was shot on film, you need to transfer the camera negative to a video format suitable for your workflow. If you want to work using a conventional video format, the transfer is typically done using a telecine. Telecines are machines capable of converting the negative image to a video signal in real time, in the process cropping and resizing the image to the appropriate resolution and converting the frame rate as necessary to record to the video format you require.

The way you choose to have the film transferred depends largely on your budget, your intended workflow, and the level of quality that’s necessary at each stage of your post-production workflow. In terms of translating the film frame into a video image, there are three general methods of managing the color and contrast of the final result.

  • One-light transfer: This is the most inexpensive way of transferring the negative. The footage you choose is transferred quickly, using the least possible number of adjustments (hence the name—one lighting adjustment for an entire roll of film) to achieve reasonably good-looking video. This method is good for obtaining offline-quality media for editing, but you usually need to retransfer from the original negative to obtain maximum quality. The advantage is that after editing, there’s usually much less footage to transfer, which saves time and money. Using this method, you request a telecine log that you can import into Final Cut Pro (or Cinema Tools) to track the correspondence between your offline media and the original film negative. (The ATN, FLEx, FTL, and ALE telecine log formats are compatible with both Final Cut Pro and Cinema Tools.)
  • Safety transfer: Safety transfers are extremely conservative, with the camera negative being transferred as neutrally as possible. The emphasis is on maximizing the amount of color and contrast within the widest available dynamic range of the video recording format, while avoiding clipping in the highlights and shadows as much as is reasonable (although some highlights, like direct light sources, sun glints, and lighting reflections, should be clipped). Creative adjustments are usually not made, and although the resulting video image often looks a bit dull, the video signal has the maximum amount of image data for doing high-quality color correction later. If you’re ultimately mastering to videotape, doing a safety transfer of all the footage you intend to use ensures that you don’t have to retransfer your material after you finish editing. If you plan to color correct the material during the finishing process, a safety transfer gives you the most flexible image for making your final adjustments.
  • Best-light transfer: The opposite of a one-light transfer, a best-light transfer is the most time-consuming and expensive method of transfer. Each section of film is transferred with individual settings, as necessary. Time is taken to do careful grades and creative adjustments. Best-light transfers usually take place when the footage is being retransferred after the offline edit has been completed, but sometimes best-light transfers are done right from the beginning of the process, to ensure that the footage looks its best from offline through online.
Popular Formats

Film is typically transferred to high-quality tape-based formats suitable for mastering, including Digital Betacam, HDCAM, HDCAM SX, and D-5, although other formats may be used for specific applications. Transfer to tapeless formats is becoming increasingly available. If you have a choice, you should decide whether you want to manage physical videotapes or volumes of digital media files.

Method of Ingest

If you’re ingesting a low-quality transfer with the intention of retransferring later, or if you plan to output a cut list for an eventual negative conform, you need to have the transfer facility provide you with a telecine log file to import into Final Cut Pro (or Cinema Tools). Final Cut Pro uses this list to create a Cinema Tools database, along with a set of offline clips that you use to capture the transferred video. All of the necessary film metadata is tracked automatically. If you’re ingesting a transfer that was done at its final quality so there’s no need for a retransfer, this step isn’t necessary.

To actually ingest the media, you use the Log and Capture window, as with any tape-based format. See Ingesting Tape-Based Media for more information.

Clip Organization

Organization happens during the telecine session, when you initially decide what footage to transfer. Typically, each camera roll of film is transferred to a new reel of videotape. (Each reel of tape usually starts at a new hour.)

Sometimes, to save on tape costs, multiple rolls are transferred to a single 60-minute tape. For 35mm film, each subsequent roll is transferred in 15-minute increments. For example, the first roll is transferred starting at 01:00:00:00, the second roll is transferred starting at 01:15:00:00, the third roll starts at 01:30:00:00, and the fourth roll starts at 01:45:00:00.

In the case of 16mm film, you can request that multiple camera rolls be assembled onto consolidated lab rolls by the lab doing the developing. Each lab roll is then treated as a single continuous roll, which can be transferred to a single 60-minute tape with ease.

After every roll of film has been transferred to a reel of tape, ingest and organization are the same as with any tape-based format. See Ingesting Tape-Based Media for more information.

Tracking and Organizational Information

During the transfer, a marker frame (also referred to as a lab roll hole, head punch, or punch hole) is assigned to each roll of film at a point before the first shot begins, with a hole punch permanently identifying that frame. The marker frame is assigned the timecode value of XX:00:00:00 (where XX is an hour value that is incremented for each subsequent camera roll being transferred). The marker frame creates an absolute timecode reference for each frame of film on that roll. The marker frame also sets up a permanent film frame–to–timecode reference that defines the timecode that’s recorded to tape and that is essential for accurately retransferring the film later.

As with any tape-based format, the three most critical pieces of metadata include the clip name you assign during capture, the reel number that matches each clip to the source videotape (and by extension, the roll of camera negative), and the timecode track that identifies which range of media came from what part of the source videotape. Accurate timecode control is critical, as is keeping careful track of reel numbers.

If the transfer is being done strictly for offline editing, you can ask for a window burn that displays both timecode and edge code. If you’re transferring film to a video format with a 4:3 aspect ratio, you can have this window burn made in the black letterboxed area so it doesn’t obscure the image. It may also be possible to write the edge code number of the source film to the user bit of VITC timecode for electronic tracking. Ask the facility doing the transfer what would be best for your situation.

Additionally, you have the option of tracking film-specific metadata by importing telecine logs (such as FLEx and ALE files) into Final Cut Pro (or Cinema Tools) to create a database that allows you to track the correspondence between the reel and timecode numbers of your videotapes and the roll and edge code numbers of the source camera negative. This is important if you’re editing transferred videotape with the intention of conforming the original negative, retransferring best-light selects, or doing a datacine transfer of your program’s selects to DPX or Cineon image sequences for digital intermediate grading and finishing.

Another advantage to importing telecine logs is that other logging information, such as film type, camera roll, telecine speed, and sometimes even the script supervisor’s notes from the shoot, is included. Ask the facility doing the transfer what options are available.

Backup and Archiving Considerations

One of the nice things about videotape formats is that the source tapes are their own backup. Some producers also opt to clone the source tapes for offsite storage for an added level of security. If you do this, make sure the timecode is accurately cloned and the reel numbers are accurately and physically marked on each tape.

Of greater importance is the careful storage and preservation of the original camera negative. If you have questions, discuss them with your lab or transfer facility.

Common Offline/Online Strategies

If you’re capturing film that was transferred at the best possible quality (a best-light or safety transfer) for a project that’s being mastered to videotape, you can work as you would with any other program using videotape source media. When you complete editing, you can finish using the transferred media as is.

If you’re planning to retransfer the selects used in your edited sequence after the offline edit is complete, you use the Export Cinema Tools Film Lists command to export the information that will be used to retransfer the shots used in the edit. Give this information to the transfer facility, which can do a best-light or safety transfer of your selects onto new tapes with matching timecode. You’ll then reingest your program’s final media from tape for finishing.

Ingesting Film Transferred as DPX or Cineon Image Sequences

If you’re working on a project that was shot on film, you need to transfer the camera negative to a video format suitable for your workflow. If you want to finish your program using a digital intermediate workflow, this is typically done using a film scanner, or datacine. Unlike a telecine (see Ingesting Film Transferred to Video), a datacine does a slower, high-resolution, frame-by-frame scan of the camera negative, which is not usually done in real time.

The result is usually a series of uncompressed DPX- or Cineon-formatted image sequences at 2K or 4K resolution. Datacine transfers are typically done as neutrally as possible, with an emphasis on maximizing the amount of color and contrast within the available dynamic range of the image format and avoiding clipping in the highlights and shadows. Creative adjustments are not usually made. The resulting scanned image often looks a bit dull but has the maximum amount of image data for doing high-quality color correction later.

Image sequences cannot be used directly with Final Cut Pro but can be converted to either online or offline media that can be matched back to the original media using Color.

Popular Formats

Scanned film is typically stored as uncompressed 10-bit logarithmic DPX or Cineon image sequences. Both DPX and Cineon are RGB color space formats with 4:4:4 chroma sampling.

Method of Ingest

There are several ways you can ingest scanned DPX or Cineon image sequences into Final Cut Pro:

  • Using Color, you can convert the scanned image sequences to Apple ProRes 4444 media, which you can then use directly for mastering your program.

  • Using Color, you can also convert the scanned image sequences to offline QuickTime files using a lower-bandwidth Apple ProRes codec. There are several Apple ProRes codecs to choose from, which lets you strike an appropriate balance between image quality and file size. This approach requires you to reconform your program to the original image sequences in Color after you finish editing.

  • You can also use a third-party utility to convert each image sequence to a format that’s usable in Final Cut Pro.

Clip Organization

The first round of organization happens during film transfer, when you initially decide what footage to transfer. Afterward, archiving and organizing the resulting DPX or Cineon media is similar to working with tapeless media. It’s extremely important that each camera roll be scanned and written to a separate directory that’s named after that roll, so that at the end of the process you have a series of separate directories, each corresponding to a roll of camera negative.

After scanning, you should back everything up (preferably in two separate places), and you should maintain the organizational directory structure of the media.

Tracking and Organizational Information

The organizational data for DPX and Cineon media should be worked out in advance with the facility doing the film-to-data transfer. A typical strategy is to assign a marker frame to each roll of film at a point before the first shot begins, with a hole punch permanently identifying that frame. Each roll’s marker frame is assigned the timecode value of XX:00:00:00 (where XX is an hour value that is incremented for each subsequent camera roll being transferred). The marker frame creates an absolute timecode reference for each frame of film on that roll.

You should request that the frame numbers incorporated into the filenames of the transferred image files be based on this timecode. Your final DPX or Cineon image sequences will then have frame numbers in the filename that, with a bit of mathematical conversion, match the timecode value in the header information, providing valuable data redundancy.

The most important piece of information for organizing DPX media is the filename of each frame, which includes the frame number that identifies the frame’s place in each sequence. For later conforming in Color, DPX filenames must have a prefix, an underscore, a frame number, and a file extension, taking the following form: Filename_0123456.dpx. Another important piece of information for Final Cut Studio workflows is the name of the directory in which each image sequence is located. Each image sequence should be stored in a directory named with the number of the camera roll the image sequence was scanned from. This is so the directory number can be used as a reel number during conversion to offline QuickTime media, for tracking the correspondence between the frames of the QuickTime media and the original film frames.

Additionally, metadata written into the header of each DPX file provides additional information for image processing and media tracking. This metadata is typically written by the facility doing the transfer and includes the following:

  • Transfer: Specifies whether the image is linearly or logarithmically encoded. Scanned film frames are typically logarithmically encoded, but Color can work with either linear or logarithmic media.
  • Low Reference: The numeric value used to identify the black point. For media being printed to film, this value is typically 95 (for logarithmically encoded media).
  • High Reference: The numeric value used to identify the white point. For media being printed to film, this value is typically 685 (for logarithmically encoded media).
  • Timecode: For compatibility with the Color method of reconforming DPX media to match an EDL generated by Final Cut Pro, the timecode value written into the DPX header should be derived from that file’s frame number. For more information, see the Color documentation.
Backup and Archiving Considerations

Unlike workflows involving tapeless media, film-scan workflows ensure that you always have a backup in the original camera negative. If something happens to your film-scan media, you can always retransfer. However, this will be expensive, so it’s best to redundantly archive all of your transferred media, preserving the directory structure you created to organize your media. Hard disk backup to multiple volumes is a good short-term solution, but optical or tape data backup may be the most suitable long-term solution.

Common Offline/Online Strategies

There are many ways of organizing an offline edit and online reconform of scanned DPX media. One of the more straightforward ways of working with DPX or Cineon media in Final Cut Studio is to use Color to generate offline QuickTime clips from the DPX or Cineon source files. During this conversion, each clip’s timecode is derived from either the timecode header metadata or the frame number in the filename, and the reel number is derived from the name of the directory in which each transferred image sequence is stored.

After you edit your sequence using these converted QuickTime clips, you then export an EDL from Final Cut Pro, which is used to reconform your project to the original DPX or Cineon media in Color. After your program has been reconformed, you grade and output your program as a single DPX or Cineon image sequence that can be delivered to a facility for film printing.

For more information about different post-production workflows involving scanned film, see the Color documentation.

Ingesting Audio

You can capture audio from analog and digital tape, or import various tapeless formats directly into Final Cut Pro for placement in your edited program. For the final mix, you can work inside Final Cut Pro, or you can send your program’s audio to Soundtrack Pro to finish it there, where you can import additional digital audio files to add to the mix. For more information about finishing audio, see Final Sound Editing, Design, and Mixing.

Popular Formats

Popular digital audio formats compatible with Final Cut Pro and Soundtrack Pro include AIFF, WAVE, Broadcast Wave Format (BWF), Sound Designer II, and QuickTime audio. You can also use MP3 and AAC files, but these require rendering, so media in either of these formats should be converted to AIFF or WAVE prior to import.

Method of Ingest

You can ingest audio into either Final Cut Pro or Soundtrack Pro, depending on the format of the audio and how you need to use it.

  • Analog and digital tape-based formats: You can capture audio from any analog or digital tape-based format using a compatible audio interface. Final Cut Pro is capable of recording up to 24 tracks of audio from tape-based formats like DAT, DTRS (which includes decks such as the Tascam DA-88 or DA-98), or ADAT using serial device control for timecode sync and control. If you’re using timecode sync, you can capture your media as QuickTime audio files to preserve the timecode sync data. You can also capture up to 24 channels of audio directly into Soundtrack Pro, but you can’t capture timecode.
  • Tapeless audio formats: Audio files such as AIFF and WAVE files are ingested using the Import File or Import Folder command in Final Cut Pro or the Browser in Soundtrack Pro. This includes audio from hard disk recorders, many of which record using the Broadcast Wave Format (BWF), which supports timecode. If you’re importing audio from a tapeless device, make sure you mount the recording media and copy all the files you plan on using to your scratch disk before importing them into Final Cut Pro or Soundtrack Pro; otherwise, they’ll go offline when you unmount the media. If you’re importing BWF files into Final Cut Pro, make sure to set the BWF Import setting to Non-Drop or Drop, as appropriate, in the Editing tab of the User Preferences window. BWF files, with accompanying timecode, can also be imported into Soundtrack Pro.
  • Importing audio from CDs: You can also directly import tracks copied from audio CDs. It’s important to copy all the tracks you want to use from the CD to your scratch disk before importing them into Final Cut Pro. Otherwise, they’ll go offline when you eject the CD.
Clip Organization

You can use Final Cut Server to organize audio you want to share among multiple users. Locally, audio media is principally organized by filename prior to import. You can use applications such as iTunes or third-party database applications to assemble libraries of music or sound effects with additional organizational data, but this data won’t necessarily translate into a format that Final Cut Pro or Soundtrack Pro can use. After the audio media is imported, you can use the Final Cut Pro Browser to add notes and comments to each clip for easier searching and sorting.

Dual system media, where the audio and video are captured using separate devices, can be synchronized and put together as merged clips. See the Final Cut Pro documentation for more information.

Tracking and Organizational Information

QuickTime audio and BWF files support timecode tracks, which are useful for synchronizing audio and video that are recorded on separate sources. All other audio formats are tracked using filename and media duration.

Ingesting Individual Still Images

Final Cut Pro and Motion both support the import of most popular still-image formats. For the best-looking images, you should consider restricting stills in your project to uncompressed formats such as TIFF. If you use JPEG files, make sure they’re saved at high quality to avoid compression artifacts.

Final Cut Pro has no real limit on the resolution of imported still images, and in fact you can use images that are larger than the frame size of your sequence to create pan and scan animations, where you zoom in to or out of an image in either Final Cut Pro or Motion. However, for the sake of rendering efficiency, it’s wise to keep the frame size of imported images to a reasonable maximum. In particular, frame size limitations in Color and Motion might affect you if you’re sending clips or sequences to either application:

  • Color is limited to a maximum frame size of 4096 x 2304 pixels. If you’re importing a still image into a Final Cut Pro sequence that you intend to send to Color, you should either limit the image file’s frame size to these dimensions or be prepared to replace the image with a version of the clip that is exported as a self-contained QuickTime movie before you send your program to Color.

  • Motion supports resolutions up to 8K, although the maximum resolution that’s supported on your computer depends on the amount of VRAM of your graphics card, the bit depth of your project, and the number of displays you’re using. It’s more realistic to limit the resolution of your images to 4K or lower.

Popular Formats

Final Cut Pro and Color support a wide range of image file formats. The most popular include TIFF, PICT, TGA, and JPEG. If you’re planning to use JPEG files, it’s best to use the least amount of compression possible to avoid artifacts in your final program.

Final Cut Pro and Motion are also capable of using layered or flattened Photoshop files in different ways. See the Final Cut Pro and Motion documentation for more information.

Method of Ingest

Still images are imported into Final Cut Pro using the Import command. In Motion, you use the File Browser to find media that you want to add to your project.

Note: In Final Cut Pro, TIFF, PICT, TGA, and JPEG files are affected by the Imported Still/RGB Video Gamma setting in the Editing tab of the User Preferences window. This preference setting determines the level of gamma that is applied to these clips when they’re imported, although you can always change the gamma level setting in the Item Properties or Browser window. For more information, see the Final Cut Pro documentation.

Clip Organization

You can use Final Cut Server to organize still images to share among multiple Final Cut Pro users. If you organize your images using iPhoto, you can access your albums and library in Motion from within the Library tab. (See the Motion documentation for more information.)

Tracking and Organizational Information

Still images are tracked by filename.

Ingesting Animation and Broadcast Design Files

If your program incorporates computer animation, broadcast design, or previously captured archival footage files from a variety of sources, you can import the files directly into Final Cut Pro or Motion as long as they’re in a compatible QuickTime format. In addition, Motion is compatible with a variety of image sequence formats. In some cases, you must install third-party QuickTime components to use QuickTime media from other editing and compositing environments.

Other formats can be converted to an appropriate QuickTime codec for your project using Compressor. For more information about format conversion using Compressor, see Format Conversion When Finishing Mixed-Format Sequences.

Popular Formats

When you create media in another application that you want to use in Final Cut Pro, it’s best to use the highest-quality codec that your system can handle in order to avoid compression artifacts in the final program. An additional consideration, especially for computer-generated imagery (CGI) and broadcast animation, is whether or not you need to preserve an alpha channel in a media file with regions of transparency in it.

  • High-quality codecs with alpha channel support for clips with transparency include Animation (8-bit) and Apple ProRes 4444 (10-bit). Both of these are RGB color space, 4:4:4 chroma-sampled formats.

  • High-quality codecs with no alpha channel support include 8- and 10-bit Uncompressed, Apple ProRes 422, and Apple ProRes 422 (HQ) (10-bit). All of these are Y′CBCR color space, 4:2:2 chroma-subsampled formats.

Method of Ingest

QuickTime files are ingested into Final Cut Pro using the Import command. In Motion, you use the File Browser to find media that you want to add to your project.

Note: In Final Cut Pro, clips whose media files are encoded using the Animation and Apple ProRes 4444 codecs are affected by the Imported Still/RGB Video Gamma setting in the Editing tab of the User Preferences window. This preference setting determines the level of gamma that is applied to these clips when they’re imported, although you can always change this setting in the Item Properties or Browser window. For more information, see the Final Cut Pro documentation.

Clip Organization

You can use Final Cut Server to organize still images to share among multiple Final Cut Pro users.

Tracking and Organizational Information

QuickTime media files are tracked by filename, reel name, and timecode. QuickTime supports additional metadata that may or may not be supported by a particular Final Cut Studio application.