Strategies for Better Tracking

Selecting a good tracking reference feature in a movie or image sequence is pivotal in achieving an accurate track. Tracking a single reference pattern with a single analysis pass rarely yields a perfect result. More often, a successful track combines automatic and manual tracking, experimenting with different parameter settings, and resetting reference points at different locations in the clip.

Finding a Good Reference Pattern

The first step in selecting a good reference pattern is to play the footage several times. As you review the clip, try to locate a reference pattern that follows as many of the following rules as possible:

  • The pattern contains perpendicular edges, such as dots, intersections, and corners (lines and straight boundaries should be avoided as tracking reference patterns).

  • It is a high-contrast pattern.

  • It contains even changes in brightness or color (an example of an uneven color or brightness change is a sharp-edged shadow that passes over your reference pattern).

  • It appears in every frame of the clip (does not move offscreen or become obscured by other objects).

  • It is distinct from other patterns in the same “neighborhood” in the clip.

Manually Modifying Tracks

You can manually modify track points.

To manually adjust an onscreen track point
  1. Position the playhead at the frame you want to modify.

    The track point at the current playhead position is highlighted.

  2. Do one of the following:

    • Drag the highlighted track point in the Canvas to adjust its position.

    • Drag in the Tracker Preview area in the Behaviors tab of the Inspector.

For fine-tuning, you can zoom in and out of the clip using the Zoom tool.

Figure. Zoom tool in the Toolbar.

The zoom follows the pointer, so place the pointer on the track point in the Canvas and drag right to zoom in. Drag left to zoom out of the clip. To return to normal view, choose 100% from the Zoom Level pop-up menu (in the lower-right section of the Toolbar). If you have a Multi-Touch trackpad you can also zoom in using a pinch open and zoom out using a pinch closed, and then scroll around the zoomed view using two-finger swipes.

You can also adjust a tracking curve in the Keyframe Editor. For more information on using the Keyframe Editor, see Keyframes and Curves.

When Good Tracks Go Bad

Once an analysis is complete, you may need to retrack a portion of the clip. Rather than tracking over bad tracking keyframes, it is recommended that you delete any bad keyframes prior to retracking. If “bad” keyframes are not deleted, the tracker may continue to use the old reference point.

Deleting Bad Keyframes in the Keyframe Editor

You can delete bad tracking keyframes in the Keyframe Editor.

To delete bad tracking keyframes
  1. Position the playhead at the frame in which you want to reset the reference pattern.

  2. In the Keyframe Editor, drag to select the keyframes you want to delete.

    Figure. Keyframe Editor curve graph showing tracking keyframes selected in a box.
  3. Control-click in the Keyframe Editor, then choose Cut from the shortcut menu (or press Delete).

  4. In the Canvas, drag the tracker to the reference point, then click Analyze.

    New track keyframes are created.

Tip: When dealing with multiple problem trackers, you may want to turn off the trackers you are not correcting to simplify the Keyframe Editor. Additionally, when fine-tuning tracks in the Keyframe Editor, you may want to simplify what is displayed in the graph. The following image displays the curves for a simple four-corner pin.

Figure. Keyframe Editor showing curves for many parameters simultaneously.

To quickly solo a curve, Option-click the parameter’s checkbox in the Keyframe Editor’s parameter list.

Figure. Keyframe Editor showing one parameter soloed.

Deleting Track Points in the Canvas

Bad track points can also be deleted in the Canvas. The track points in the Canvas represent keyframes in the Keyframe Editor.

To delete bad track points in the Canvas during analysis
  1. During analysis, press the Esc key to stop the tracking.

  2. In the toolbar, ensure that the Adjust Item tool is selected.

    Figure. Adjust Item tool.
  3. Ensure that a track point is active in the Canvas.

    You may want to zoom into the Canvas in order to better see the active track points. The track point at the current playhead position appears larger than other track points.

    Figure. Canvas showing Active track point at current playhead position.

    Note: If you press the Delete key when a track point is not selected, the entire path is deleted.

  4. Do one of the following:

    • Press the Delete key to delete the track point at the current position of the playhead.

    • Move the playhead to the frame where you want to begin deleting track points, and press the Delete key.

      Only active keyframes are deleted.

To delete bad track points in the Canvas after analysis is complete
  1. With the tracking analysis complete and the tracking behavior selected, move the playhead to the frame with the track point (or start of the track points) you want to delete.

  2. In the toolbar, ensure that the Adjust Item tool is selected.

  3. Ensure that a track point is active in the Canvas.

    You may want to zoom into the Canvas in order to better see the active track points. The track point at the current playhead position appears larger than other track points.

  4. Press the Delete key. Each press of the key removes one track point.

Smoothing Tracking Keyframe Curves

You can smooth a track with the Keyframe Thinning function in the Animation menu in the Keyframe Editor parameter list. Prior to smoothing the curve, you may want to copy the behavior (as a backup) to the Library or duplicate the behavior in the project.

To smooth a track curve
  1. In the Keyframe Editor, click the Animation menu for the track you want to smooth, then choose Reduce Keyframes from the pop-up menu.

    Figure. Keyframe Editor showing Animation menu options and a curve with a keyframe at every frame.

    The Reduce Keyframes dialog appears.

    Figure. Reduce Keyframes dialog.

    Reduce Keyframes applies a thinning algorithm to the keyframes for the chosen parameter. This reduces the number of keyframes in a parameter while attempting to maintain a similar shape to the curve. The thinning algorithm can be adjusted in two ways. Increasing the Maximum Error Tolerance results in fewer keyframes. Increasing the Smoothing Factor makes smoother curves between keyframe values.

    This example uses 5, which means that 5 track points centered on the currently evaluated point are used to compute the current point’s new, smoothed value. This is a standard Gaussian (bell-curve type) filter. In other words, if you leave it at 5, when the value of frame 12 is computed, frames 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 are considered. If set to 3, it uses frames 11, 12, and 13. The larger the Smoothing Factor, the more points are considered (and thus more calculations done) for every point in the curve.

  2. Set the values in the Reduce Keyframes dialog.

    As you adjust the sliders or value sliders in the dialog, the curve is modified in the Keyframe Editor.

    Figure. Keyframe Editor showing a curve with reduced keyframes.
  3. Click OK.

Averaging a Track Curve

Another possible smoothing option is to apply the Average parameter behavior to a track curve in the Keyframe Editor. This behavior smoothes the transition from one keyframe value to another. Averaged motion moves more fluidly.

To apply an Average parameter behavior to a track curve
  • In the parameter list of the Keyframe Editor, control-click the parameter name, then choose Average from the shortcut menu.

    The track is averaged, indicated by the simplified curve that appears behind the keyframes in the Keyframe Editor.

    For more information on using the Average parameter behavior, see Average.

Converting Tracks to Keyframes

Tracking data that is recorded or referenced by the Match Move, Stabilize, or Unstabilize behavior can be “baked” into keyframes on the transformed object. The tracking keyframes are applied to the tracked object and the behavior is deleted from the project. You can then modify the animation curves in the Keyframe Editor.

Because the Analyze Motion behavior does not transform the image, analyzed tracks cannot be converted into keyframes. However, a Match Move or Stabilize behavior that references data from an Analyze Motion behavior can be converted into keyframes.

To convert a tracking behavior to keyframes
  1. Select the Match Move, Stabilize, or Unstabilize behavior that you want to convert.

  2. Choose Object > Convert to Keyframes (or press Command-K).

    A dialog appears confirming the conversion.

  3. Click OK.

    The behavior is converted into editable keyframes and the tracking behavior is deleted.

For more information on converting behaviors to keyframes, see Converting Behaviors to Keyframes. For more information on using the Keyframe Editor, see Keyframes and Curves.

Preserving Image Quality

Ideally, you should track an image with the most amount of raw data. The better the quality of your footage, the better the quality of the track.

Asking Motion for a Hint

Motion can “suggest” good reference patterns.

To display the suggested tracking reference points
  • Press the Option key, click a tracker in the Canvas, and hold down the mouse button.

    Note: You need at least one tracker in the Canvas to display suggested tracking reference points.

    The suggested reference points appear in the Canvas on the footage and in the magnified inset as small red plus signs.

    Figure. Canvas window showing suggested tracking points.

    When you move a tracker toward one of the suggested points, the tracker snaps to the point.

    The suggested points are not necessarily ideal tracking reference points for the feature you want to track in the clip. Motion is merely picking locations in the current frame that meet the track point criteria, such as an area of high contrast.

    Figure. Canvas window showing suggested tracking points.

Giving Motion a Hint

When using the Analyze Motion behavior, you can direct a tracker where to look in a later frame for its reference pattern. This tool is ideal for the following types of clips:

  • A clip that contains fast-moving features

  • A clip with a subjects moving in a relatively straight vector (with or without obstructions)

  • A clip with swish pans (you may have to reset the “look-ahead” tracker at each panning change)

Important: If your track fails and you reposition your tracker, you must also reset the look-ahead tracker in the Canvas to provide a new motion vector from the new reference point.

To define look-ahead frames
  1. Apply an Analyze Motion behavior to a clip.

  2. In the Canvas, position the tracker on the desired reference pattern.

    In the following image, the tracker is positioned on a reference pattern on the front bumper of the car.

    Figure. Canvas window showing a tracker applied to an object.
  3. In the Behaviors tab of the Inspector, use the Look Ahead Frames slider or value slider to specify how many frames you want the tracker to look ahead.

    Note: The maximum default for the Look Ahead Frames slider is 10 frames. However, you can enter a larger frame amount using the adjacent value slider.

  4. While holding down the Command key, click the tracker in the Canvas, then drag in the direction the reference pattern is moving in the clip.

    As you Command-drag the track point, an inset displays a magnified view of the frame specified in the Look Ahead Frames parameter.

    Figure. Canvas window showing magnified inset view of Look Ahead frame.
  5. When the look-ahead tracker is positioned on the reference pattern, release the mouse button.

    When you click the Analyze button, the new reference point is used as the tracking pattern.

    Note: Look Ahead Frames can be used when tracking in reverse. When the Reverse checkbox is selected in the tracking behavior’s parameters and you use the Look Ahead Frames parameter, you are looking at previous frames rather than future frames. The Reverse checkbox is only available for the Analyze Motion, Track (in the Parameter behaviors category), and Track Points (in the Shapes behaviors category) behaviors.

Manually Coaxing Your Track

When dealing with more challenging tracks, you can manually insert track position keyframes to help guide the tracker towards a reference pattern. For example, if you have a footage with significant motion blur or objects that partially obscure the tracking pattern, you can manually create tracker position keyframes to help guide the tracker.

To manually coax a track using the Record button
  1. Apply a Motion Tracking behavior to the clip, then enable Record (press A).

  2. In the Canvas, position the tracker at the reference point you want to track.

    A track position keyframe is created in the behavior (visible in the Keyframe Editor).

  3. Navigate to the next frame at which you want to create a keyframe.

    Note: You can press Shift-Right Arrow key to jump forward 10 frames, or press Shift-Left Arrow key to jump backward 10 frames.

  4. In the Canvas, position the tracker at the reference point you want to track.

  5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until you’ve completed the track.

  6. In the Behaviors tab of the Inspector, click the disclosure triangle for the track you have manually adjusted, then choose Use Existing Keyframes from the Fail Behavior pop-up menu.

  7. Turn off the Record button (press A).

  8. Go to the first frame of the clip, then click the Analyze button in the behavior HUD or Inspector.

    Important: Even though keyframes have been created, you must analyze the footage in order to obtain the tracking data.

To manually coax a track without enabling Record
  1. Apply a Motion Tracking behavior to the clip.

  2. In the Canvas, position the tracker at the reference point you want to track.

  3. Choose Object > Add Position Keyframe.

    This command is available for the Analyze Motion, Match Move, Stabilize (with manual trackers), Track Points (in the Shape behaviors category), and Track (in the Parameter behaviors category) behaviors.

    Note: Keyframes cannot be created for automatically stabilized footage. Use the Track Region option for adjusting automatic stabilization, or convert the stabilized footage to keyframes. For more information on the Track Region parameter, see Adjusting the Stabilize Behavior’s Track Region. For more information on converting tracking data to keyframes, see Converting Tracks to Keyframes.

  4. Navigate to the next frame at which you want to create a keyframe.

  5. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until you’ve completed the track.

  6. In the Behaviors tab of the Inspector, click the disclosure triangle for the track you have manually adjusted, then choose Use Existing Keyframes from the Fail Behavior pop-up menu.

  7. Go to the first frame of the clip, then click the Analyze button in the behavior HUD or Inspector.

    Note: You can also use the Tracker Preview in the Behaviors tab of the Inspector to reposition trackers in the Canvas.

    Important: Even though keyframes have been created, you must analyze the footage in order to obtain the tracking data.

Tracking Images with Perspective, Scale, or Rotational Shifts

For images with significant change in size and angle, you can try a few different strategies. First, try using a larger search area. You can increase Motion’s default tracking search size using the Search Size parameter in the Behaviors tab of the Inspector. Click the track’s disclosure triangle to display the Search Size parameter.

A second strategy is to lower the Fail Tolerance value. With a lower Fail Tolerance value, the tracker is more likely to find a false match. With a higher value, the tracker is more strict in finding a match. Click the track’s disclosure triangle to display the Fail Tolerance parameter.

Another strategy is to jump to the midpoint frame of the clip and track forward to the end frame of the clip. Then return to the midpoint frame and track backward to the beginning of the clip.

Tracking Obscured or Off-Frame Points

In addition to experimenting with different tracker parameter settings, there is a basic technique to correct track points that are obscured by moving offscreen or by an object passing in front of them.

The following sequence is a simple example of a candidate for offset tracking. As the car moves forward, it passes a tree that temporarily obstructs the reference pattern.

Figure. Sequential images of a car passing behind a tree.

When the reference pattern becomes obscured, the Offset Track checkbox lets you move the tracker, picking a new reference pattern in a different area from the original reference pattern. The offset between the original reference pattern and the new pattern is calculated to maintain continuity in the resulting track path.

In the following example, the track is obscured by a tree, so the tracker is moved to a nearby reference pattern, and tracking continues until the original pattern reappears. Even though one region is examined, the points are saved in another region. The second tracking pattern should travel in the same direction as your original pattern.

To offset (move) the onscreen tracker control to an unobstructed area of the image
  1. Go to the frame where you want to begin the offset track.

    When a track is lost during an analysis, Motion automatically jumps back to the frame at which the track failed. The “bad” track point is identified by an “x” in the Canvas.

    Figure. Canvas showing a tracker path running into an obstacle.

    You can use the bad track point, or use any point prior to the failed track frame, to move the tracker and select a new reference feature. In the Canvas, the track point at the current playhead position is emphasized.

    Figure. Canvas window showing the highlight on the track point for the current frame.
  2. Select the Offset Track checkbox in the HUD or Behaviors tab of the Inspector.

    Figure. HUD showing Stabilize behavior controls containing Offset Track checkbox.

    Note: The Offset Track parameter is available in the Analyze Motion behavior and in the Stabilize behavior. Before the parameter becomes available in the Stabilize behavior, you must explicitly add a tracker using the Add button in the Inspector.

  3. Drag the tracker to a new position in the Canvas.

  4. Click Analyze to restart the motion analysis.

    Motion continues to keyframe the trajectory of the original track point, based on the movement of the new offset reference pattern.

    Tip: When you use Offset Track, make sure that the new reference pattern is as close to the original tracking feature as possible. Ideally, the offset feature should share the same motion as the originally tracked feature and appear on the same subject.

    Note: When the cursor is held over a tracker in the Canvas, a tool tip displays the start frame for the tracking analysis. When you perform an offset track, the tool tip displays the frame from which the offset track began (if the playhead is in the range of the offset track).

Tracking Retimed Footage

When working in a project that includes tracking and retiming tasks, use the following guidelines for more successful results:

  • Because the Motion tracker analyzes in a project’s frame rate, ensure that the frame rate of the footage you plan to track matches the frame rate of the project. For example, when you want to track 24 frames-per-second (fps) footage, your project’s frame rate should be 24 fps. Once the tracking analysis is completed, retime the clip using the Retiming parameters in the Media tab of the Inspector or the Retiming behaviors.

  • Do not retime the footage prior to the tracking analysis.

  • Do not retime the footage, perform a tracking analysis, then retime the footage again. This may adversely affect your track.

Note: If you really want to track a clip after it has been retimed, it is recommended that you retime and export the clip, then import the clip and perform the tracking analysis.

Troubleshooting Stabilizing Effects

If the output of a stabilize operation is unsatisfactory, there are several things you can try to improve the result.

Keeping It Real

The automatic motion analysis (analysis without trackers) used by the Stabilize behavior works best with real images. Artificial images, such as those with no texture, are not recommended for use with the Stabilize behavior’s automatic mode. Shots with very strong pans are also not recommended.

Adding Trackers to the Stabilization

If a stabilized clip has a particularly bumpy section that is not getting smoothed, you can add trackers to noncontiguous sections of a clip.

Any stabilize data from the automatic motion analysis is overwritten by the portions of the clip that are analyzed using the onscreen trackers.

To use a tracker for a portion of a stabilize operation
  1. Once the Stabilize motion analysis is complete, play the clip to determine what section you want to track.

    Important: Always analyze the entire clip before adding any trackers. The Stabilize behavior needs “’meaningful” data—a large range of frames—to yield the best results.

  2. Set an Out point for the tracker analysis: Position the playhead at the frame you want to stop the analysis, then choose Mark > Mark Play Range Out (or press Command-Option-O).

  3. Position the playhead at the frame where you want to start the track, then click the Add button in the Inspector.

  4. Position the newly added tracker on the reference pattern you want to track in the Canvas, then click the Analyze button in the HUD or Inspector.

    The specified play range is tracked, creating track points in the Canvas and tracking keyframes in the Keyframe Editor.

    Note: When using this strategy to track multiple noncontiguous sections of the clip, use the same tracker whenever possible to simplify the track and to avoid clutter in the Keyframe Editor.

    This strategy is not recommended for small portions of the clip, such as using the default stabilization for 25 frames, a tracker analysis for 10 frames, the default stabilization for 10 frames, and so on.

Changing the Smoothing Parameters

If you’re trying to smooth the motion in a clip, you should first try adjusting the smoothing parameters. These parameters include Translation Smooth, Rotation Smooth, and Scale Smooth. This can be accomplished without having to reanalyze the clip.

To display the Smoothing parameters for the Stabilize behavior
  • In the Behaviors tab in the Inspector, choose Smooth from the Method pop-up menu.

    The Translation Smooth, Rotation Smooth, and Scale Smooth parameters become available.

Reanalyzing at a Higher Quality

When analyzing, choose Better from the Quality pop-up menu in the Behaviors tab of the Inspector. This may take longer, but the quality of the analysis is higher.

Editing the Analysis Data

If neither of the prior solutions helps, look at the “Analyze.Confidence” parameter in the Keyframe Editor, then look for frames where the Confidence parameter falls to very low values. You can convert the Stabilize behavior to keyframes in order to create transform keyframes on the stabilized object. These keyframes can then be edited in the Keyframe Editor. Try deleting any keyframes that create unusual spikes at the frames where the Confidence curve value was low.

For more information on converting behaviors to keyframes, see Converting Tracks to Keyframes.

Removing Black Borders Introduced by Stabilizing

When you use the Stabilize behavior, the resulting transformations that are made to smooth or stabilize the shot cause moving black borders to appear around the edges of the image. While this is necessary to achieve the desired effect, you probably don’t want these black borders to appear in the final shot.

There are a few ways you can choose to handle these borders.

Zooming the Clip

You can zoom the clip using the Borders pop-up menu in the Behaviors tab of the Inspector. The disadvantage of this method is the resulting softening of the image, depending on how much it must be enlarged.

To zoom the clip
  • In the Behaviors tab of the Inspector, choose Zoom from the Borders pop-up menu.

    The clip is expanded to the full size of the Canvas, preventing black borders from appearing around the edges of the stabilized clip.

Scaling the Output Image to Fit the Original Frame Size

If you need to output the resulting image at the same size as the original, the quickest fix is to scale the image after the Stabilize analysis. You’ll need to enlarge the image to the point where all instances of black borders fall outside the edges of the frame. Like the Zoom option (in the Borders pop-up menu), this method softens the image.

Note: This workflow is a manual version of zooming the clip using the Zoom option from the Borders pop-up menu.

To scale the stabilized image
  1. Select the clip and click the Properties tab of the Inspector.

  2. Adjust the Scale parameter so that the borders no longer appear at the edges of the clip.

Distorting the Edges

One last suggestion is to experiment with different filters to stretch the edges of the image to fill any gaps. For example, you can experiment with the Scrape filter to stretch out the edges of the image. This solution is highly dependent on the type of image and may introduce other image artifacts that may or may not be acceptable.

In the following image, a large border is created when the clip is stabilized.

Figure. Canvas showing an object with a large black border around it.

Next, a Scrape filter is applied to the group in which the stabilized clip resides. The left image shows the clip when the filter is first applied to the group. At first, it does not appear especially helpful. In the right image, the center and rotation of the filter are adjusted, removing the black edge by stretching the right edge of the image.

Fgure. Canvas showing clip with Scrape filter applied.

Important: The filter must be applied to the clip’s group, not to the clip, for this technique to have any effect.

Note: You may need to select the Fixed Resolution checkbox in the Group tab of the Inspector so the effect of the Scrape filter is not cropped.

Some General Guidelines

The Motion tracker uses the source image for its tracking analysis. This means that the tracker automatically uses the best search area, the best color, the best contrast, subpixel accuracy, and so on in the clip to generate the best possible tracking data. Common tracking strategies, such as using filter tricks, manually resizing a tracking “box” or search area, or specifying a subpixel sampling amount are not required.

This does not mean that you do not have to work to achieve a perfect track, of course. Use the following guidelines to help you decide what may and what may not assist you in your tracking analysis.

What will help you:

  • Removing interlacing (fields) from the footage prior to tracking. To remove the fields from footage, select the footage in the Media tab of the Project pane, click the Media tab in the Inspector, then choose an option from the Field Order pop-up menu.

    Note: Interlacing can be present in clips stabilized using the automatic analysis mode in the Stabilize behavior.

  • Stabilizing a clip, exporting the clip, importing the clip, then stabilizing the clip again.

  • Sharpening or blurring a clip or an object with a filter, exporting the clip, importing the clip into the same group as the original footage, tracking the filtered clip, then using that tracking data as the source for other tracking behaviors.

    Note: Other filter tricks may also be helpful, such as using a filter to isolate a less-noisy color channel of a clip or an object.

  • Setting the View resolution to a lower setting, which may speed the tracking analysis

What will not help you:

  • Applying any filter to a clip or object prior to tracking

  • Soloing or isolating a tracked clip. This does not speed tracking analysis.

  • Adding multiple Stabilize behaviors. This does not help to further stabilize an analyzed clip, because the tracker analyzes the original source footage and not the result of an analyzed clip (or a filtered clip).

  • Converting a track to keyframes and stabilizing again

  • Selecting a tracking reference feature that does not change perspective, scale, or rotation. The Motion tracker is designed to handle changes in perspective, scale, and rotation very well.

Tracking and Groups

There are a few special considerations when tracking groups.

Corner-Pinning Groups

You can corner-pin groups using the Match Move behavior. Use the following guidelines for the best results:

  • To corner-pin a 2D group, it is recommended that you select the Fixed Resolution checkbox in the Group tab of the Inspector.

  • To corner-pin a 3D group, you must select the Flatten checkbox in the Group tab of the Inspector. If Flatten is not enabled for the group, the Four Corners option will not be available from the Type pop-up menu in the Match Move parameters.

    Once Four Corners is chosen from the Type pop-up menu, Four Corner is enabled in the Properties tab of the Inspector, causing the group to be rasterized. For more information on rasterization, see Groups and Rasterization.

Using either of the above techniques may still result in dynamic resizing. If you receive unwanted results, export the group, import the group, then corner-pin the object.

Parallax in 3D Groups

When match moving 3D groups that contain objects that are offset in Z space, parallax is simulated. Parallax is the apparent shift of an object against a distant background caused by a shift in perspective, such as a change in camera position.

To remove a parallax effect, select the Flatten checkbox for the tracked group in the Group tab of the Inspector.

Saving Tracks

As with all behaviors in Motion, you can save tracking behaviors to the Library. Keep in mind, however, that a tracking behavior needs to reference the tracked source object. Therefore, it may make more sense to save the entire group that contains the tracking behavior, as well as the source footage, to the Library.

To save a group to the Library
  1. Open the Library and select the category into which you want to save the group, such as the Favorites category.

  2. Drag the group that contains the tracking behavior and its source (tracked) footage from the Layers tab or Timeline into the stack at the bottom of the Library.

    The group is added to the Library category.

To save a behavior to the Library
  1. Open the Library and select the Favorites, Favorites Menu, or Behaviors category.

  2. Drag the customized behavior you want to save from the Layers tab, Timeline, or Inspector into the stack at the bottom of the Library.

    When you save a customized item to the Library, it is saved in the /Users/username/Library/Application Support/Final Cut Studio/Motion/Library/ folder.

    For more information on saving behaviors to the Library, see Saving and Sharing Custom Behaviors.

To add a group to a project from the Library
  1. Open the Library and select the category that contains the group.

  2. Do one of the following:

    • To nest the group in an existing group, drag it to the existing group in the Layers tab.

    • To create a new group, drag it to an empty area in the lower portion of the Layers tab.

      The group is added to the project.

To apply a behavior to a clip from the Library
  1. Open the Library and select the Favorites, Favorites Menu, or Behaviors category.

  2. Drag the behavior to the clip in the Layers tab, Timeline, or Canvas.

To reference another tracking behavior in a project
  1. Add an Analyze Motion, Match Move, Stabilize, or Unstabilize behavior.

  2. In the tracking behavior’s HUD or Inspector, choose a track from the tracking behaviors pop-up menu.

    The track is applied to the tracking behavior.

    Note: In a Stabilize behavior, only tracks from other Stabilize behaviors can be chosen from the tracking behaviors pop-up menu.