Parameter Behaviors

These behaviors can be applied to any object parameter that can be animated, and their effects are limited to just that parameter. The same parameter behavior can be added to different parameters, resulting in completely different effects. For example, you can apply the Oscillate behavior to the opacity of an object to make it fade in and out, or you can apply it to the rotation of an object to make it rock back and forth. You can also apply parameter behaviors to filter parameters, generator parameters, the parameters of particle systems, or even the parameters of other behaviors. Examples include Oscillate, Randomize, and Reverse.

For more information on applying Parameter behaviors, see Applying Parameter Behaviors.

The following sections cover the Parameter behaviors:

Audio

This behavior allows you to animate nearly any parameter based on properties of an audio file, such as bass frequency. For example, the Audio parameter behavior can be applied to the Scale parameter of an object so that it scales up and down based on the amplitude of the bass, or to the Opacity parameter so that it fades in and out to the beat. For more information on using the Audio parameter behavior, see Audio Parameter Behavior.

Average

This behavior smoothes the transition from one value to another caused by keyframes and behaviors that are applied to a parameter. Use the Average behavior to smooth out animated effects. Averaged motion moves more fluidly, while averaged changes to parameters such as Opacity and to filter parameters appear to happen more gradually. Use the Window Size parameter to adjust the amount by which to smooth the affected parameter.

Tip: The Average behavior can be used to smooth out the sequence of values generated by a Randomize behavior.

Parameters in the Inspector
  • Window Size: A slider lets you adjust the amount of smoothing to apply to the affected parameter by specifying the number of adjacent frames to average together. Higher values apply more smoothing by averaging a wider range of values, resulting in more fluid animation. Lower values average a narrower range of values and apply less smoothing with values that are closer to the original.
HUD Controls

The HUD lets you adjust the Window Size parameter and change the parameter assignment.

Related Behaviors

Clamp

This behavior allows you to define a minimum and maximum value for an animated parameter. In the following illustration, the center image has an applied Vortex behavior. The outer images circle around the center image, as indicated by the red animation path.

Figure. Canvas window showing animation paths for two objects, with a Vortex behavior applied to a third object.

In the following illustration, a Clamp behavior is applied to the X Position parameter of the image at the top of the Canvas. The Max value is set to 230 and the Min value is set to 0. The image travels 230 pixels to the right but does not move left past the 0 point, creating a half-circle animation.

Figure. Canvas window showing the animation path when a Clamp behavior is applied to one of the orbiting objects.

Notice that the circle motion path is essentially cut in half. If a negative value is entered in the Min value field, the image moves past the 0 point.

Parameters in the Inspector
  • Min: A value slider that lets you define the minimum amount of change for an animated parameter.
  • Max: A value slider that lets you define the maximum amount of change for an animated parameter.

    The value is represented as a percentage, in pixels, or in degrees, depending on the parameter assignment. For example, if Clamp is applied to the Rotation parameter, the Min and Max values are degrees. If Clamp is applied to the X Position parameter, the values are in pixels.

HUD Controls

The HUD lets you set the clamp to Min, Max, or Min and Max values, and also to change the parameter assignment.

Related Behaviors

Custom

The Custom behavior allows you to make your own behaviors by creating a set of parameters, then keyframing them to create the type of animation you want to apply to an object. By saving custom behaviors you create in the Library, you can create your own collection of behaviors to suit your needs.

Prior to creating a Custom behavior, you must first add the Custom behavior to an object in the Canvas. The Custom behavior is added to an object like all other non-Parameter behaviors in Motion.

Note: Although the Custom behavior is a Parameter behavior, it does not appear in the shortcut menu when you Control-click a parameter.

Parameters in the Inspector

Unlike other behaviors, the Custom behavior doesn’t start out with any parameters in the Behaviors tab. Instead, a pair of pop-up menus allows you to add and remove any parameters you want to use.

Figure. Behaviors tab showing the default Custom behavior settings.
HUD Controls

There are no HUD controls for this behavior.

Adding a Custom Behavior

Prior to creating a Custom behavior, you must first add the Custom behavior to an object in the Canvas.

For more information on saving behaviors, see Saving and Sharing Custom Behaviors.

To add a Custom behavior to an object
Do one of the following:
  • Select the object to which you want to add a Custom behavior, click the Add Behavior icon in the Toolbar, then choose Parameter > Custom from the pop-up menu.

  • In the Library, select the Behaviors category, select the Parameter subcategory, then drag the Custom icon to the object in the Canvas, Layers tab, or Timeline.

    The Custom behavior is applied to the object. The behavior has no effect until you add a parameter to the behavior.

To add a parameter you want to animate in a Custom behavior
  • Choose a parameter you want to add to the Custom parameter list from the Add Parameter pop-up menu. This menu contains every animateable parameter.

Figure. Behaviors tab showing a parameter being added to the Custom behavior from the Properties > Transform > Position submenu.

The parameter appears in the Behaviors tab below the Custom behavior.

Figure. Behaviors tab showing the added parameter.

Once you’ve added all the parameters you want to animate in your Custom behavior, you can keyframe them in the Keyframe Editor to create whatever animated effect you require. For more information on keyframing parameters to create animation, see Animating Behaviors.

To remove a parameter from the Custom parameter list
  • Choose the parameter you want to remove from the Remove Parameter list.

Figure. Behaviors tab showing a parameter being removed from a Custom behavior.

That parameter no longer appears in the Custom parameter list. Any keyframes that were applied to that parameter are deleted.

Once you have animated all the parameters you added, you can save the Custom behavior into the Library for future use. For more information about saving Custom behaviors to the Library, see Saving and Sharing Custom Behaviors.

When you apply a Custom behavior that you’ve saved in the Library to an object in a project, its keyframed animation is scaled to the duration of the object to which it is applied. This means that no matter how long the original Custom behavior was, you can apply it to any object, and the animated effect speeds up or slows down to accommodate the new object’s duration.

Exponential

The Exponential parameter behavior creates more natural animations when scaling objects, especially when using high values. For example, when an object scales from very small to very large, the animation appears to slow down as the object reaches its upper scale values. The Exponential parameter behavior works like the Ramp behavior, but applies a mathematical function to create an exponential curve (rather than linear) between the two values. This allows the animation to progress slowly when the scale values are small and speed up when the scale values are large.

Tip: When applied to parameters other than Scale, the Exponential parameter behavior creates more organic animations than other interpolation modes.

You can also change the interpolation modes of keyframes to Exponential. For more information, see Modifying Curves.

Parameters in the Inspector
  • Start Value: The value that’s added to the parameter at the first frame of the Exponential behavior.
  • End Value: The value the Exponential behavior reaches at the last frame of the behavior. Over the life of the behavior, the parameter the Exponential behavior is applied to makes a transition from the Start Value to the End Value plus the original value.
  • Start Offset: A slider that lets you delay the beginning of the behavior’s effect relative to the first frame of its position in the Timeline. Adjust this parameter to make the behavior start later. The units of this parameter are in frames.
  • End Offset: A slider that lets you offset the end of the behavior’s effect relative to the last frame of its position in the Timeline, in frames. Adjust this parameter to make the behavior stop before the actual end of the behavior in the Timeline. Using this slider to stop the effect, instead of trimming the end of the behavior in the Timeline, freezes the end of the effect for the remaining duration of the object. Trimming the end of the behavior resets the object to its original parameter.
HUD Controls

The HUD lets you set the start and end values and change the parameter assignment.

Related Behaviors

Link

The Link parameter behavior forces the value of one parameter to match that of another “linked” parameter. The source behavior can be within the same object or from another object. The linked parameters must contain numerical data. Parameters controlled by checkboxes, menus, and other non-numeric values cannot be linked. The linked parameters also must contain the same number of attributes. You cannot link a compound parameter such as Scale X-Y-Z to a parameter such as Opacity which has only one slider. You can however, link a compound parameter such as Scale X-Y-Z to Position X-Y-Z.

Figure. Inspector showing Link behavior.

The values of the source parameter can be scaled to more accurately apply to the destination parameter, so for example a source parameter with a range of 1–100 can be scaled when applied to a parameter with a range of 0 – 1. The values can also be offset from the source, and the effect can be mixed with the destination value in a variety of ways to create different resulting effects.

The Link behavior can be applied to parameters that have been animated with behaviors or keyframes; however, it does not affect the parameter when the Start Values or End Values are zero.

When using the Link behavior to control an object’s position parameter, the linked coordinates are based on the center point of the current group. So when an object is linked to another object within the same group, it will share an identical position. However, if the source object is in a different group, the coordinates may appear offset in space.

If your goal is to match an identical position across groups with different center points, you can create an invisible dummy object in the group containing the source, link it to the source object, then use the Match Move behavior to copy the dummy object’s position to that of the intended target. Match Move automatically compensates for inter-group position offsets and provides the option to either attach one object to another or to mimic the source object’s transformations. For more about Match Move, see Motion Tracking Behaviors.

You can also link to the group’s coordinates instead of the object’s, and use the Offset parameters in the Link behavior to obtain the position you want. However, if that group is subsequently added to another group, the linked object may again not move as expected.

Parameters in the Inspector
  • Source Object: The object in which the source parameter resides. Click the To pop-up menu to select from the objects in the current project.
  • Mix Time Range: When the Mix Over Time is set to one of the Ease or Acceleration options, this slider controls over how many frames the ease or acceleration occurs.

    Tip: Ease In and Accelerate begin at the In point of the Link behavior, and Ease Out and Decelerate end at the Out point of the Link behavior. Therefore, you can trim the Link behavior in the timeline to specify where the ease or acceleration begins and/or ends.

  • Custom Mix: When the Mix Over Time parameter is set to Custom Mix, this slider can be animated to create a user-determined mix between the source and target parameter values.
  • Scale: Slider to specify a value to be multiplied with the Source parameter before it is applied to the target.
  • Clamp Source Value Within Range: This checkbox becomes available when the Apply Link pop-up menu is set to a choice requiring a minimum or maximum value. When selected, values that exceed the defined range will be pinned to the highest or lowest allowable setting.
  • (Parameter) offset: This slider allows you to create a constant offset between the source parameter value and the value applied to the target parameter.
  • (Parameter) min: When the Apply Link When pop-up menu is set to “Source value above minimum,” “Source value between min and max,” or “Source value outside min and max,” a “min” slider appears for each component of the source parameter. Adjusting this slider defines a minimum value to limit when the link behavior is active.
  • (Parameter) max: When the Apply Link When pop-up menu is set to “Source value below maximum,” “Source value between min and max,” or “Source value outside min and max,” a “max” slider appears for each component of the source parameter. Adjusting this slider defines a maximum value to limit when the link behavior is active.
HUD Controls

The HUD lets you set all parameters and change the parameter source and target.

Logarithmic

The Logarithmic parameter behavior is the inverse of the Exponential behavior. Like the Exponential behavior, it creates more natural animations when scaling objects, especially when using high values. The Logarithmic parameter behavior applies a mathematical function to create a logarithmic curve (rather than linear) between the two values—the effect ramps up quickly, and then the effect slows down. This allows the animation to progress slowly when the scale values are small and speed up when the scale values are large.

The Logarithmic behavior can be applied to parameters that have been animated with behaviors or keyframes; however, it does not affect the parameter unless the Start Values or End Values are nonzero.

Tip: When applied to parameters other than Scale, the Logarithmic parameter behavior creates more organic animations than other interpolation modes.

Note: You can also change the interpolation modes of keyframes to Logarithmic. For more information, see Modifying Curves.

Parameters in the Inspector
  • Start Value: The value that’s added to the parameter at the first frame of the Logarithmic behavior.
  • End Value: The value the Logarithmic behavior reaches at the last frame of the behavior. Over the life of the behavior, the parameter that the Logarithmic behavior is applied to makes a transition from the Start Value to the End Value, plus the original value.
  • Start Offset: A slider that lets you delay the beginning of the behavior’s effect relative to the first frame of its position in the Timeline. Adjust this parameter to make the behavior start later. The units of this parameter are in frames.
  • End Offset: A slider that lets you offset the end of the behavior’s effect relative to the last frame of its position in the Timeline, in frames. Adjust this parameter to make the behavior stop before the actual end of the behavior in the Timeline. Using this slider to stop the effect, instead of trimming the end of the behavior in the Timeline, freezes the end of the effect for the remaining duration of the object. Trimming the end of the behavior resets the object to its original parameter.
HUD Controls

The HUD lets you set the start and end values and change the parameter assignment.

Related Behaviors

MIDI

The MIDI behavior allows you to edit and animate object parameters using standard MIDI devices, such as a synthesizer. For the true motion graphics mixmaster.

Parameters in the Inspector
  • ID: Displays the identification number of the MIDI control (such as a knob, dial, or key) that you are manipulating.
  • Value: When you are manipulating the MIDI control, displays the standard MIDI value between 0 and 1.
  • Scale: Increasing the Scale value multiplies the Value parameter in the MIDI behavior. This means that when Scale is increased, the MIDI control has a larger range of value and a greater effect on the parameter it’s controlling. For example, when you are using a knob to adjust an object’s rotation, the default rotation value range (when Scale is set to 1) for a full turn of the knob may only be 30 percent. When the Scale value is increased to 13, the rotation value of a full turn of the knob is increased to 370 degrees.
HUD Controls

The HUD controls allow you to adjust the Control Type, ID, Value, and Scale parameters, as well as change the parameter assignment.

Applying the MIDI behavior

The MIDI behavior is applied in the same way as all other Parameter behaviors. In the following examples, the MIDI parameter behavior is used to adjust an object’s opacity and rotation.

Note: This behavior can only be used if you have a MIDI device correctly connected to your computer.

To use the MIDI behavior to adjust an object’s opacity
  1. Select an object, then select the Opacity parameter in the Properties tab of the Inspector.

  2. Control-click the parameter, then choose MIDI from the shortcut menu.

    The MIDI parameters are displayed in the Behaviors tab. By default, Control Type is set to Learning.

    Figure. Behaviors tab showing Midi behavior settings.

    Like all other Parameter behaviors, the Apply To field displays the parameter to which the behavior is applied.

  3. On your MIDI device, tweak the control (such as the knob, dial, or key) that you want to use as the controller for the Opacity parameter.

Note: When in Learning mode, the first control adjusted on the MIDI device is set as the control. To reset the selected controller, choose Learning from the Control Type pop-up menu, and adjust another control on the MIDI device.

The identification number of the MIDI control is displayed in the ID field. The value range of the control is 0 to 127, the default MIDI control value.

Because an object’s opacity can only fall between 0 (completely transparent) to 100 (completely opaque), the default MIDI values are sufficient to adjust the parameter.

To use the MIDI parameter behavior to adjust an object’s rotation
  1. Select an object, then select the Rotation parameter in the Properties tab of the Inspector.

  2. Control-click the parameter, then choose MIDI from the shortcut menu.

  3. On your MIDI device, tweak the control (knob, dial, key, and so on) that you want to use as the controller for the Rotation parameter.

    As mentioned above, the default Value range is 0 to 1. Because the Rotation value of an object can be much larger, you can use the Scale parameter to multiply the Value range.

  4. To give the control more sensitivity, increase the Scale value.

Negate

Inverts the value of each keyframe and behavior effect in the parameter to which it’s applied by multiplying the parameter by –1. The Negate behavior basically flips each parameter value to its opposite. Animation paths are flipped, rotation is reversed, and any effect’s parameter is changed to its opposite.

For example, applying the Negate behavior to the Position parameter of an object with an animation path results in the animation path moving to the opposite quadrant of the Canvas.

Figure. Canvas window showing effect of Negate behavior.

Note: If you want to reverse the motion taking place on an animation path, rather than flipping the shape of the animation path itself, use the Reverse parameter behavior.

Parameters in the Inspector
HUD Controls

The HUD control allows you to change the parameter assignment.

Related Behaviors

Oscillate

The Oscillate behavior animates a parameter by cycling it between two different values. You can customize how wide apart the high and low values are as well as the number of oscillations per minute. The Oscillate behavior can create all kinds of cyclical effects. For example, if you apply the Oscillate behavior to the rotation property of an object, it will begin to rock back and forth. This happens because the rotation property cycles back and forth between the original rotation value plus and minus the Amplitude value that’s set in the Oscillate behavior.

Applying the Oscillate behavior to the X value of the Scale parameter instead causes the width of the object to cycle, and it repeatedly stretches and compresses for the duration of the behavior.

The Oscillate behavior is additive, meaning that the value generated by this behavior is added to the original value of the parameter to which it’s applied.

Parameters in the Inspector
  • Phase: A slider that lets you adjust the point of the specified oscillation at which the behavior starts. This parameter allows you to put multiple objects with identical Oscillate behaviors out of phase with one another so that they don’t all look the same.
  • Amplitude: A slider that lets you adjust the maximum values that the parameter oscillates between. The parameter swings between the amplitude value and the negative of the amplitude value. Higher values result in more extreme swings from the beginning to the ending of each oscillation.
  • Speed: A slider that lets you adjust the speed at which the oscillation occurs, in oscillations per minute. Higher values result in faster oscillations.
  • Half Range: When this checkbox is selected, the sine (or other wave shape) wave is essentially cut in half and does not cross over the value of 0. For example, when Amplitude is set to 100, the parameter oscillates between 100 and –100. When Half Range is selected, however, the parameter oscillates between 100 and 0. When Amplitude is set to –100, the parameter oscillates between –100 and 0.

    Tip: When you are oscillating position parameters, set Wave Shape to Sine and enable Half Range to create a bouncing effect.

    Figure. Keyframe Editor showing the effect of enabling Half Range.
  • Start Offset: A slider that lets you delay the beginning of the behavior’s effect relative to the first frame of its position in the Timeline. Adjust this parameter to make the behavior start later. The units of this parameter are in frames.
  • End Offset: A slider that lets you offset the end of the behavior’s effect relative to the last frame of its position in the Timeline, in frames. Adjust this parameter to make the behavior stop before the actual end of the behavior in the Timeline. Using this slider to stop the effect, instead of trimming the end of the behavior in the Timeline, freezes the end of the effect for the remaining duration of the object. Trimming the end of the behavior resets the object to its original parameters.
HUD Controls

The HUD lets you adjust the Phase, Amplitude, Speed, and Half Range parameters as well as change the parameter assignment of the Oscillate behavior.

Related Behaviors

Creating a Decaying Oscillation

When you are oscillating an object’s rotation or position, a common effect is to “decay” or “dampen” the animation over time. This means that the animation gradually slows or comes to a stop. You can achieve this effect using keyframes to slow the amplitude of the oscillation.

To decay an oscillating rotation using keyframes
  1. Go to the frame where you want the animation to begin, then enable Record (press A).

  2. Set the Amplitude value to the maximum value you want to use in your project.

    Note: When Record is enabled, any value change to a parameter using the Inspector, HUD, or Canvas creates a keyframe.

  3. Go to the frame where you want the animation to come to a stop and set the Amplitude value to 0.

When the object is selected, you can see the dampening of the animation—caused by the keyframed Amplitude parameter—in the Keyframe Editor (when Animated is chosen from the Show pop-up menu).

Figure. Keyframe Editor showing a decaying occilation effect.

When the Oscillate behavior is selected, you can see the keyframed Amplitude value in the Keyframe Editor (when Animated is chosen from the Show pop-up menu).

Figure. Keyframe Editor showing the keyframed Amplitude parameter.

Quantize

The Quantize behavior lets you create an incremental animation in any keyframed or behavior-influenced parameter. For example, if opacity is animated so that an object gradually fades in over time, you can add the Quantize behavior to make the object become opaque in steps.

Note: The Quantize behavior only works with animated parameters.

Parameters in the Inspector
  • Step Size: A value slider that defines the size of the steps, based on the units of the parameter to which it is applied. For example, when Quantize is applied to rotation, the steps are in degrees (even though it is not a dial control). When applied to position, the steps are in pixels.

    The following left screenshot shows the projected path (the red line) of a layer with an applied Throw behavior. The right image displays the same animation path after the Quantize behavior is added. In this example, the Step value is set to 90.

    Figure. Canvas window showing the effect of adding the Quantize behavior to an object animated using a Throw behavior.
  • Offset: A slider that offsets the steps. For example, when Quantize is applied to a Position parameter and Step Size is set to 100, an object “steps” in increments restricted to 100 pixels; thus, the step offset is 100, 200, 300, and so on. If Offset is set to 50, the step offset is restricted to 50, 150, 250, and so on.
HUD Controls

The HUD lets you define the step size, offset, and parameter assignment.

Ramp

The Ramp behavior lets you create a gradual transition in any parameter that can be animated, from the Start Value to the End Value. The speed of the transition is defined by the length of the Ramp behavior in the Timeline, and by the behavior’s end value. Additional parameters allow you to define how the transition occurs, whether it’s at a single continuous speed, or whether it accelerates over time.

Ramp is a versatile behavior. If you apply it to the Scale property, it works like the Grow/Shrink behavior. If you apply it to the Opacity property, you can fade an object in or out in different ways. Although you can use the Ramp behavior to mimic other Motion behaviors, it can be applied to any parameter you want.

Note: This behavior is additive, meaning that the value it generates is added to the original value of the parameter to which it’s applied.

For example, suppose you’re animating different segments of a bar graph, and each segment needs to grow until it reaches a specific length. (Hint: this can be done by assigning a subtracting mask to each bar object, and animating the position of each bar’s mask to slowly reveal each bar over time.)

Once you’ve arranged the different bars with their masks in the Canvas, you can apply Ramp behaviors to the X values of each mask to easily move each mask off to the side, giving the illusion that each bar is growing. Set the End Value parameter of each Ramp behavior to the length you want each bar to reach, and you’re done!

Figure. Canvas window showing the effect of applying a Ramp behavior to a mask's position parameter.
Parameters in the Inspector
  • Start Value: The value that’s added to the parameter at the first frame of the Ramp behavior.
  • End Value: The value the Ramp behavior reaches at the last frame of the behavior. Over the life of the behavior, the parameter the Ramp behavior is applied to makes a transition from the Start Value to the End Value, plus the original value.
  • Curvature: This parameter lets you ease the acceleration with which the Ramp behavior transitions from the Start Value to the End Value. Higher Curvature values result in an ease in/ease out effect, where the value slowly begins the transition, gradually speeds up as the behavior continues, then gradually slows down to a stop as it reaches the end. Curvature does not affect the overall duration of the effect, since that is defined by the length of the behavior in the Timeline.
  • Start Offset: A slider that lets you delay the beginning of the behavior’s effect relative to the first frame of its position in the Timeline. Adjust this parameter to make the behavior start later. The units of this parameter are in frames.
  • End Offset: A slider that lets you offset the end of the behavior’s effect relative to the last frame of its position in the Timeline, in frames. Adjust this parameter to make the behavior stop before the actual end of the behavior in the Timeline. Using this slider to stop the effect, instead of trimming the end of the behavior in the Timeline, freezes the end of the effect for the remaining duration of the object. Trimming the end of the behavior resets the object to its original parameter.
HUD Controls

The HUD lets you adjust the Ramp’s Start Value, End Value, and Curvature parameters, as well as change the parameter assignment.

Related Behaviors

Randomize

Creates a continuous sequence of randomly increasing and decreasing values, based on the parameters defining the range and type of values that are generated.

Although the values created with this behavior appear to be random, they’re actually predetermined by the parameter settings you’ve chosen. As long as you don’t change the parameters, the frame-by-frame values created by this behavior remain the same. If you don’t like the values that were randomly generated, click the Generate button in the Behaviors tab in the Inspector to pick a new random seed number. This number is used to generate a new sequence of values.

The Apply Mode parameter determines how values generated by this behavior are combined with other behaviors and keyframes that affect the same parameter. This provides you with different ways of using a Randomize behavior to modify a parameter’s preexisting values.

The Randomize behavior is useful for creating jittery effects, such as twitchy rotation, flickering opacity, and other effects requiring rapid and varied changes over time that would be time-consuming to keyframe. The Randomize behavior can be modified with other behaviors, such as Average and Negate, to exercise further control over the values being generated.

Parameters in the Inspector
  • Amount/Multiplier: This parameter is set to Amount when the Apply Mode is set to Add, Subtract, or Add and Subtract, and is set to Multiplier when the Apply Mode is set to Multiply. This parameter defines the maximum value the Randomize behavior will generate.
  • Frequency: A slider that lets you adjust the amount of random variation per second. Higher values will generate faster variations, whereas lower values will generate slower variations.
  • Noisiness: Adds an additional overlay of random variance to the Frequency you’ve set. Higher Noisiness values result in more erratic variations in the affected parameter.
  • Link: This parameter appears when you apply this behavior to a two-dimensional parameter (such as Scale) or three-dimensional parameter (such as Position) that consists of X, Y, and/or Z values. Turn this checkbox on to keep the behavior’s effect on each value proportional.
  • Affect Subobjects: This parameter only appears when the Randomize behavior is applied to a parameter of the Sequence Replicator behavior. When Affect Subobjects is selected, each object has a different random behavior. When Affect Subobjects is deselected, each object undergoes the same animation.
  • Random Seed: A button that lets you pick a new random seed number. This number is used to randomly generate new sequences of values, based on the other parameters of this behavior.
  • Start Offset: A slider that lets you delay the beginning of the behavior’s effect relative to the first frame of its position in the Timeline. Adjust this parameter to make the behavior start later. The units of this parameter are in frames.
  • End Offset: A slider that lets you offset the end of the behavior’s effect relative to the last frame of its position in the Timeline, in frames. Adjust this parameter to make the behavior stop before the actual end of the behavior in the Timeline. Using this slider to stop the effect, instead of trimming the end of the behavior in the Timeline, freezes the last random value generated by this behavior for the remaining duration of the object. Trimming the end of the behavior resets the parameter to its original value.
HUD Controls

The HUD lets you adjust the Amount, Multiplier, Frequency, Noisiness, Link (for multidimensional parameters), Start Offset, and End Offset parameters, as well as parameter assignment.

Related Behaviors

Rate

This behavior increases a parameter’s value over time, with the rate of increase determined by the Rate slider. Unlike the Ramp behavior, this behavior has no end value; it simply continues to increase or decrease the parameter it’s applied to until the end of the parameter.

Note: To decrease a parameter over time, enter a negative value into the Rate parameter.

Parameters in the Inspector
  • Rate: A value slider that lets you set a rate of increase over time for the affected parameter. Measured in percentage increase per second.
  • Curvature: This parameter lets you ease the acceleration with which the Rate behavior transitions from the Start Value to the End Value. Higher Curvature values result in an ease in/ease out effect, where the value slowly begins the transition, gradually speeds up as the behavior continues, then gradually slows down to a stop as it reaches the end. Curvature does not affect the overall duration of the effect, since that is defined by the length of the behavior in the Timeline.
  • End Offset: A slider that lets you offset the end of the behavior’s effect relative to the last frame of its position in the Timeline, in frames. Adjust this parameter to make the behavior stop before the actual end of the behavior in the Timeline. Using this slider to stop the effect, instead of trimming the end of the behavior in the Timeline, freezes the last random value generated by this behavior for the remaining duration of the object. Trimming the end of the behavior resets the parameter to its original value.
HUD Controls

The HUD has controls for Rate, Curvature, and parameter assignment.

Related Behaviors

Reverse

Unlike the Negate behavior, which inverts the value of the parameter to which it’s applied, the Reverse behavior reverses the direction of any animation that affects a parameter, whether it’s caused by behaviors or keyframes. For example, when you apply the Reverse behavior to path animation that begins at the left and moves to the right, the animation path won’t move, but the object instead begins at the right and moves to the left. The Reverse behavior basically switches the beginning and ending points of animated objects.

Parameters in the Inspector
HUD Controls

The HUD control allows you to change the parameter assignment.

Related Behaviors

Stop

The Stop behavior suspends parameter animation (created by keyframes or applied behaviors) of an object. For example, if you assign the Stop Parameter behavior to the Position parameter of an object that is moving across the screen and rotating, the object ceases to move across the screen but continues to rotate.

Each behavior’s effect on the object is frozen at the first frame of the Stop behavior in the Timeline. Keyframes that are applied to that parameter cease to have any effect for the duration of the Stop behavior in the Timeline.

If the Stop behavior is shorter than the object to which it’s applied, all keyframes and behaviors affecting that channel immediately take effect after the last frame of the Stop behavior. For more information on using the Stop behavior, see Using the Stop Behavior.

Parameters in the Inspector
HUD Controls

The HUD control allows you to change the parameter assignment.

Track

This behavior allows you to apply tracking data to a parameter of an effect, such as the center point of the Light Rays filter. For more information on using the Track behavior, see Track Parameter Behavior.

Wriggle

This behavior works similarly to the Randomize behavior, but with a slower effect.

Note: A Wriggle behavior applied to an Opacity parameter set to 100% does not have much effect. This is because there isn’t much room to “wriggle.” For a better result, set the Opacity to 0, or change the Apply Mode to Subtract.

Parameters in the Inspector
  • Amount/Multiplier: This parameter is set to Amount when the Apply Mode is set to Add, Subtract, or Add and Subtract. This parameter is set to Multiplier when the Apply Mode is set to Multiply. This parameter defines the maximum value that the Wriggle behavior generates.
  • Frequency: A slider that lets you adjust the amount of random variation per second. Higher values generate faster variations, whereas lower values generate slower variations.
  • Wriggle Offset: A slider that allows you to offset the sequence of random values when you want to apply the same Wriggle behavior to multiple objects. By offsetting each object’s version of the Wriggle behavior, you can prevent objects from moving in sync.
  • Noisiness: This slider adds an additional overlay of random variance to the Frequency you’ve set. Higher Noisiness values result in more erratic variations in the affected parameter.
  • Link: This parameter appears when you apply the Wriggle behavior to a two-dimensional parameter (such as Scale) or three-dimensional parameter (such as Position) that consists of X, Y, and/or Z values. Turn this checkbox on to keep the behavior’s effect on each value proportional.
  • Affect Subobjects: This parameter only appears when the Wriggle behavior is applied to a parameter of the Sequence Replicator behavior. When Affect Subobjects is selected, each object has a different wriggle behavior. When Affect Subobjects is deselected, each object undergoes the same animation.
  • Random Seed: A button that lets you pick a new random seed number. This number is used to randomly generate new sequences of values, based on the other parameters of this behavior.
  • Start Offset: A slider that lets you delay the beginning of the behavior’s effect relative to the first frame of its position in the Timeline. Adjust this parameter to make the behavior start later. This parameter is measured in frames.
  • End Offset: A slider that lets you offset the end of the behavior’s effect relative to the last frame of its position in the Timeline, in frames. Adjust this parameter to make the behavior stop before the actual end of the behavior in the Timeline. Using this slider to stop the effect, instead of trimming the end of the behavior in the Timeline, freezes the last random value generated by this behavior for the remaining duration of the object. Trimming the end of the behavior resets the parameter to its original value.
HUD Controls

The HUD lets you adjust the Amount, Multiplier, Frequency, Wriggle Offset, Noisiness, Link (for multidimensional parameters), Start Offset, and End Offset parameters, as well as change the parameter assignment.

Related Behaviors