Groups and Rasterization

Rasterization affects 2D and 3D groups in different ways. When a 2D group is rasterized, the blend modes on objects within the group no longer interact with objects outside of the group. When a 3D group is rasterized, the group as a whole can no longer intersect with objects outside of the group. The rasterized 3D group is treated as a single object and uses layer order (in the Layers tab), rather than depth order when composited in the project.

For more information on layer order versus depth order, see Layer Order and Depth Order.

Note: When a group is rasterized, cameras and lights in the project still interact with objects within the rasterized group.

Important: Lighting in a 2D group does not pass beyond the boundaries of that 2D group, whether it is rasterized or not.

The following operations on a 2D group trigger the rasterization of that group:

The following operations on a 3D group trigger the rasterization of that group:

Once an operation triggers a rasterization on a group, the following occurs:

Important: 3D particle emitters, 3D replicators, and nonflattened text objects are treated as 3D groups for the purposes of rasterization.

Examples of 2D Group and 3D Group Rasterization

The following examples show the effect of rasterization on the blend modes of 2D groups. In both examples, the lone elephant image, which is the topmost group in the Layers tab, overlaps a portion of the family of elephants image, which resides in a separate 2D group in the Layers tab. And in both examples, the lone elephant group has its Blend Mode parameter set to Vivid Light. In the nonrasterized left-hand example, the lone elephant’s blend mode interacts with the pixels of the group underneath it (the family of elephants). In the right-hand example, however, the topmost group is rasterized; consequently, its Vivid Light blend mode no longer interacts with the pixels of the second group.

Figure. Canvas window showing 2D groups before and after rasterization.

The next examples show the effect of rasterization on the intersection of 3D groups. In the left-hand, nonrasterized example, two groups (Group A and Group B) containing rectangle shapes intersect in 3D space. In the right-hand example, Group A has been rasterized; consequently, Group A and Group B no longer intersect.

Figure. Canvas window showing 3D groups before and after rasterization.

Important: If a group’s Blend Mode is set to Pass Through and any of the group’s layers have different Blend Modes applied, the layers are not rasterized.