How Do You Export the Files You Need?

There are two commands in Final Cut Pro that you use to output QuickTime content.

If you want to export a file that uses the same settings as those of your clip or sequence, the Export QuickTime Movie command might be what you need for a quick output. For more information, see The Export QuickTime Movie Command.

The Export Using QuickTime Conversion command gives you more flexibility, particularly in terms of the type of compression and file formats supported. For more information, see The Export Using QuickTime Conversion Command.

The Export QuickTime Movie Command

The Export QuickTime Movie command creates a new QuickTime movie file. You can use this command to export Final Cut Pro clips or sequences with their current settings or any of the sequence settings available in Final Cut Pro.

This command allows you to choose settings based on sequence presets in Final Cut Pro. You can also choose to use the existing settings of the clip or sequence you are exporting, or create customized settings in a custom Sequence Preset Editor. If you are exporting using the existing settings, you can choose whether or not to recompress the frames.

If you want to export your movie in a format that is not natively supported by Final Cut Pro, such as a QuickTime movie file with a video codec used for the web, you should use the Export Using QuickTime Conversion command instead. If you are exporting with the same settings as your sequence, or if you want to convert to some other video format commonly supported by Final Cut Pro, you should use the Export QuickTime Movie command.

The Export Using QuickTime Conversion Command

Unlike the Export QuickTime Movie command, which only exports to a QuickTime movie file, the Export Using QuickTime Conversion command allows you to export to almost any file format QuickTime supports, using any video and audio codec supported by that format. Everything is customizable: image dimensions, frame rate, audio sample rate, video codec, audio codec, and so on.

Note: Because QuickTime has extensive support for most codecs and file formats, there may be a lot of options for some formats.

While the Export Using QuickTime Conversion command may seem advantageous, there are times when the Export QuickTime Movie command may be better. For example, Export Using QuickTime Conversion always recompresses your media, even if you select the same codec, and in 8-bit only. The Export QuickTime Movie command has an option for not recompressing frames, reducing unnecessary artifacts when exporting to the same video codec. It is also 8-bit only. Use Export QuickTime Movie for the best quality with 10-bit codecs.