Viewing and Changing the Properties of a Clip

Each item in the Browser, such as a clip, has a set of properties. You can view all the properties of a clip in the Item Properties window as well as in columns in the Browser. Some properties can be changed directly in the columns of the Browser; others can be changed in the Item Properties window.

Certain properties, such as frame size or video rate, are determined by a clip’s media file and cannot be changed without using the Media Manager.

For a detailed table that describes all clip properties, see Elements of a Final Cut Pro Project.

Changing Clip Properties in the Browser

Being able to change clip properties directly in the Browser columns is very convenient. You don’t need to open any additional dialogs or windows unless you have a specific reason for doing so. For example, you can clear the In or Out point of a clip, or enter a comment in one of the Master Comment columns.

It’s just as easy to change the properties for multiple clips as it is for a single clip, although some clip properties can only be changed one clip at a time. If you want to quickly change many properties of a single clip, it may be easier to use the Item Properties window.

For more information, see Viewing and Changing Clip Properties in the Item Properties Window.

To change a clip’s property in a Browser column
Do one of the following:
  • Control-click a column for the clip or sequence you want to change, then choose an option or setting from the shortcut menu.

    Figure. A shortcut menu listing clip property options for a column in the Browser.
  • Select a clip, click a column, then enter the new information in the text field.

    Figure. Browser window showing a field in a column selected and ready for changes.

    If a text field doesn’t appear when you click or Control-click a column, the property cannot be changed directly in the Browser. You may be able to change the property in the Item Properties window, or it may be a property you can’t modify.

    Once you’ve selected one text field in a column of the Browser that can be edited, you can press Tab to automatically select that clip’s next editable property.

You can select multiple clips and change them all at once. Some columns that allow you to do this are the Good, Description, Pixel Aspect, Reel, and Anamorphic columns.

To change the properties of multiple clips in a Browser column
  1. Select the desired clips.

    For more information, see Browser Basics.

  2. Control-click the column of one of the selected clips, then choose a new setting or option from the shortcut menu.

Viewing and Changing Clip Properties in the Item Properties Window

If you find yourself constantly scrolling through the Browser to find particular clip properties, you can save yourself some time by viewing the clip’s properties in the Item Properties window instead. The Item Properties window is also a convenient way of viewing properties of clips that refer to multiple tracks within media files, or multiple media files on disk—for example, merged clips and multiclips. Three tabs in this window—Format, Timing, and Logging—allow you to view or change any clip property. An additional Film tab is used for viewing film metadata imported from Cinema Tools.

Viewing and Modifying Clip Properties

The Item Properties window displays a detailed view of each clip’s properties in a consistent, organized way.

To view and modify clip properties
  1. Select a clip in the Browser or Timeline, or double-click a clip to open it in the Viewer.

  2. Do one of the following:

    • Choose Edit > Item Properties, then choose an option from the submenu (or press Command-9).

    • Control-click a clip in the Browser, then choose an option from the Item Properties submenu in the shortcut menu.

  3. In the Item Properties window, click a tab to see and modify a clip’s properties.

    Figure. Item Properties window showing tabs that you can click to display options for modifing a clip's properties.

For detailed information about item properties, see Elements of a Final Cut Pro Project.

Finding a Clip’s Media File

With the exception of internally generated clips (such as slugs or color bars), all clips have a media file path in their Source property.

To identify the media file to which a clip refers
  1. Select a clip in the Browser, then choose Edit > Item Properties > Format (or press Command-9).

    The Item Properties window appears, displaying all of the properties of the clip. The clip’s Source property contains a file path to the clip’s media file. In some cases, the entire path may be truncated to fit within the limits of the window.

  2. Click Cancel, press Command-Period (.), or press Escape to close the Item Properties window without making any changes.

Finding a Clip’s Start and End Timecode Values

By definition, a clip’s Media Start and Media End properties represent the first and last frames of a media file.

To identify the start and end timecode values of a clip’s media file
  1. Select a clip in the Browser and choose Edit > Item Properties > Timing (or press Command-9, then click the Timing tab).

    The Item Properties window appears, displaying all of the properties of the clip. The clip’s Media Start and Media End properties show the starting and ending timecode numbers of the media file, representing the first and last video frames.

  2. Click OK (or press Return or Enter) to close the Item Properties window.

Changing the Properties of Affiliate Clips

Because master clips and their affiliate clips share certain properties, you need only change the property of one of the master or affiliate clips to change that property in all of them. For instance, if you want to change a clip’s name, it doesn’t matter whether you change the name in the master clip or any of its affiliate clips. Since they all share the same name property, all the clips will have the new name.

Most properties are shared between master and affiliate clips, but there are a few exceptions. For example, In and Out points are unique to each master and affiliate clip, so trimming one clip doesn’t affect the duration of all the other affiliated clips. For more information about clip properties, see Elements of a Final Cut Pro Project.