Specifying Destination Tracks in the Timeline

When you edit a source clip into a sequence, you need to specify the sequence tracks where your source clip items are placed. You use the Source and Destination controls in the Timeline to specify which sequence tracks receive clip items from the source clip. Source and Destination controls are most often used when you perform three-point edits, but they can also affect some aspects of drag-to-Timeline editing. For more information, see Three-Point Editing.

Understanding Source and Destination Controls

The number of available Source controls corresponds to the number of clip items in the source clip currently open in the Viewer. For example, a typical clip has one video clip item and two audio clip items. In this case, one video and two audio Source controls appear in the Timeline. If, instead, you open a clip in the Viewer that has one video item and four audio items, one video and four audio Source controls appear in the Timeline.

Figure. Destination control, Source control, and Timeline patch panel in the Timeline.

Every track in your sequence has a Destination control. By assigning source clip items to destination tracks using these controls, you determine which items from your source clip go into which tracks when edits are performed.

Important: If you copy and paste clips, the paste destination is determined by Auto Select controls, not Source and Destination controls. For more information, see Using Auto Select to Specify Tracks for Selections.

Setting Destination Tracks

To control which sequence track a source clip item is placed in, you connect the Source control to the corresponding Destination control. There are several different ways to do this.

Important: While editing, make sure that Source controls are connected to the Destination controls for the correct tracks. If you don’t, individual video or audio items in your source clip will end up in the wrong tracks in the Timeline.

Figure. Timeline window showing V1, A1, and A2 selected as destination tracks.
To assign a source clip item to a destination track in the Timeline
Do one of the following:
  • Control-click a Source control, then choose a new destination track from the shortcut menu.

  • Control-click a Destination control, then select a Source control to assign to it.

  • Drag a Source control so that it connects to a Destination control.

  • Click a Destination control; the nearest Source control above is assigned to it.

To assign the v1 Source control to a destination video track
  • Press F6 and the number of the video track you want to assign as the destination track (this works for tracks 1 through 9).

To assign the a1 Source control to a destination audio track
  • Press F7 and the number of the audio track you want to assign as the destination track (this works for tracks 1 through 9).

To assign the a2 Source control to a destination audio track
  • Press F8 and the number of the audio track you want to assign as the destination track (this works for tracks 1 through 9).

    For example, to assign the a2 source clip item to sequence track A4, press F8 and then press 4.

Changing Source and Destination Control Connections

You can change source and destination track assignments in the Timeline in several ways.

To change Source and Destination control connections
Do one of the following:
  • Control-click a Source control, then choose a track from the shortcut menu.

  • Control-click a Destination control, then choose a Source control from the shortcut menu.

  • Click a Destination control.

    The first Source control above that track moves to that track.

  • Option-click a Destination control.

    The first Source control beneath that track moves to that track.

  • Drag one Source control on top of another to switch their connections.

    For example, if Source control a1 is connected to Destination control A1, and Source control a2 is connected to Destination control A2, when you drag the a2 Source control onto the a1 Source control, the connections are reversed (a1 is connected to A2, and a2 is connected to A1).

Disconnecting Source and Destination Controls

You can prevent specific video or audio source clip items from being edited into your sequence by disconnecting Source and Destination controls. For example, if you disconnect the video Source control prior to making an edit, only the audio source clip items are edited into the Timeline.

For example, if you want to edit the video clip item in the Viewer into your sequence, but you don’t want the audio clip item, you can simply disconnect all of the audio Source controls in the Timeline, leaving only the video Source and Destination controls connected. Performing an overwrite edit adds the video portion of the selected clip to your sequence, ignoring the source clip audio.

Figure. Timeline window showing the v1 source clip item connected to the destination video track V1, and the audio Source controls disconnected from the Destination controls.

Disconnected Source controls remain disconnected even when you open a new clip in the Viewer. This is true even if the clip has a different number of video and audio clip items than the previously opened clip.

To disconnect Source and Destination controls in the Timeline
Do one of the following:
  • Click the Source or Destination control to break the track assignment.

    Figure. Timeline window showing connected Source and Destination controls for the video destination track and disconnected Source and Destination controls for audio tracks.
  • Press Shift-F6 to deselect the current video destination track.

  • Press Shift-F7 to deselect the current audio channel 1 destination track.

  • Press Shift-F8 to deselect the current audio channel 2 destination track.

Note: You can also lock any track you don’t want source clip items edited into by clicking that track’s Lock Track control, located in the track header. If a track is locked, it is ignored as a destination track. (For more information see Locking Tracks to Prevent Edits or Changes.)

Resetting Destination Tracks to the Default State

You can reset Source or Destination controls to their default state at any time. All available Source controls are reconnected to the accompanying Destination controls. For example, the a1 Source control is reconnected to the A1 Destination control, the a2 Source control is reconnected to the A2 Destination control, and so on.

To reset the destination track assignments to their default state
  • Control-click in the Timeline patch panel, then choose Reset Panel from the shortcut menu.

Exceptions to Normal Use of Source and Destination Controls

There are several exceptions to the way you normally use Source and Destination controls to specify destination tracks for source clip items.

When Dragging Clips Directly to the Timeline

If you drag a clip from the Browser or Viewer directly into a specific track in the Timeline, it is placed on that track even if that track is not a destination track. However, the currently selected destination tracks modify this operation in two ways:

  • If the video Source and Destination controls are disconnected and you drag a clip to an audio track: No video is edited into your sequence, and vice versa.
  • If you connect nonadjacent Source controls: The source clip items are edited into the sequence using the track separation defined by the Source controls. For example, if A1 and A3 are the current audio destination tracks, a clip that you drag to your sequence will always have one empty track between the two source audio clip items, and will keep that one-track offset no matter which audio tracks you drag the items into.

When Using the Superimpose Edit

If you edit a clip into your sequence using a superimpose edit, it is edited into the track above the currently selected destination track. Any clips that are already there are moved up to a new track, creating one or more additional tracks if necessary. (Superimpose edits are explained in Three-Point Editing.)

When Recording with the Voice Over Tool

The Voice Over tool records audio to the track connected to Source control a2. For more information, see Using the Voice Over Tool.