Three-Point Editing Examples

There are a few key things to keep in mind when you are doing three-point editing.

Edit points set
Results
  • Clip In and Out points

  • Sequence In point

The In point of the source clip is placed at the sequence In point, and the duration of the edit is determined by the clip In and Out points.
  • Clip In point

  • Sequence In and Out points

The In point of the source clip is placed at the In point in the sequence, and the duration of the edit is determined by the sequence In and Out points.
  • Clip In and Out points

  • Sequence Out point

The Out point of the source clip is placed at the Out point of the sequence, and the duration of the edit is determined by the clip In and Out points. This is known as “backtiming” an edit. You can use this method when you want to make sure a particular frame of a clip ends at a specific point in a sequence. For example, you can use this method to make sure the last frame of a clip ends on a musical beat in the Timeline.
  • Clip Out point

  • Sequence In and Out points

The Out point of the source clip is placed at the Out point of the sequence, and the duration of the edit is determined by the sequence In and Out points. If there is no sequence In point, the Timeline playhead is used as the In point.

Example: Editing a Specific Clip into Your Sequence

The simplest way to perform an edit is to specify In and Out points for a clip in the Viewer, and then specify the destination In point in your sequence by positioning the playhead in the Canvas or Timeline.

To edit a specific clip into your sequence
  1. Double-click a clip to open it in the Viewer. (This is your source clip.)

  2. Specify In and Out points for your source clip in the Viewer.

    Figure. Viewer window showing In and Out points set in the scrubber bar.
  3. In the Canvas or Timeline, move the playhead to the location in your sequence where you want the clip to start (the sequence In point).

    Figure. Timeline window showing the playhead located where an edit should occur.
  4. Now, if you do an overwrite edit, you’ll see that the duration of your clip, defined by the In and Out points in the Viewer, has been edited into the sequence.

    Figure. Timeline window showing a clip that has overwritten clips in a sequence.

As you can see, defining only three points—the clip In and Out points in the Viewer and the sequence In point in the Timeline—gives you total control of the edit that’s performed.

Example: Editing a Clip into a Gap in Your Sequence

You can also do the reverse of the previous editing example. For example: You have a gap in your edited sequence and you want to fill it with a new clip. You know where you want the source clip to start, and you don’t particularly care where it ends. You can specify an In point in the Viewer, and specify In and Out points in the Timeline to coincide with the gap.

To edit a clip into a gap in your sequence
  1. Double-click a clip to open it in the Viewer. (This is your source clip.)

  2. Specify an In point for the source clip in the Viewer.

    Figure. Viewer window showing a clip with an In point set.
  3. In the Timeline, move the playhead to the middle of the gap you want to fill.

    Figure. Timeline window showing the playhead placed in a gap between clips.
  4. Choose Mark > Mark Clip (or press X) to set In and Out points around the gap.

    Note: You must select the Auto Select controls for the tracks containing the gap. For more information, see Using Auto Select to Specify Tracks for Selections.

    Figure. Timeline window showing sequence In and Out points set around a gap in the sequence.
  5. If you do an overwrite edit, you’ll see that your clip, defined by the In and Out points in your sequence, has been edited into the sequence.

    Figure. Timeline window showing a clip edited into the sequence at the location of the sequence In and Out points to fill the gap.

Example: Backtiming a Clip into Your Sequence

Instead of editing a clip into your sequence using clip In and Out points in the Viewer and a sequence In point in the Canvas or Timeline, you can edit clips using only an Out point in the Canvas or Timeline. This is called backtiming a clip. You can use this method when you want to make sure a particular frame of a clip ends at a specific point in a sequence. In the resulting edit, your source clip’s Out point is placed at the Out point you set in your sequence, and the rest of the clip appears in your sequence before this point, to the left.

To edit a clip into your sequence using only an Out point in the Canvas or Timeline
  1. Double-click a clip to open it in the Viewer. (This is your source clip.)

  2. Specify In and Out points for the source clip in the Viewer.

    Figure. Viewer window showing In and Out points in the scrubber bar.
  3. In the Timeline, move the playhead to the point in your edited sequence where you want your clip to end, and set an Out point.

    Figure. Timeline window showing an Out point set in the sequence.
  4. If you do an overwrite edit, you’ll see that your clip has been edited into the sequence so that the Out point of your clip lines up with the Out point you specified in the Timeline.

    The rest of your clip has overwritten any material to the left of the Out point for the duration defined by the In and Out points set in the Viewer.

    Figure. Timeline window showing an inserted clip that ends at the sequence Out point.

Example: Editing a Clip with No Specified In or Out Points into Your Sequence

If you don’t specify In or Out points for a clip in the Viewer prior to editing, Final Cut Pro edits in the entire clip, either to the position of the playhead or to an edit point specified in the Canvas or Timeline.

To edit a clip into your sequence that has no specified In or Out points
  1. Double-click a clip to open it in the Viewer, but don’t set In or Out points.

    Figure. Viewer window showing that no In or Out point has been set in the scrubber bar.
  2. In the Timeline, move the playhead to the location in your sequence where you want the clip to start (the sequence In point).

    Figure. Timeline window showing the playhead positioned where a new clip should begin.
  3. Now, if you do an overwrite edit, you’ll see that the entire clip in the Viewer has been edited into the sequence.

    Since you used an overwrite edit, any clip items that were already in those tracks in the sequence have been overwritten by the source clip.

    Figure. Timeline window showing a clip inserted at the location of the playhead.