Pedalboard

The Pedalboard simulates the sound of a number of well-loved and famous “stompbox” pedal effects. You can process any audio signal with a combination of stompboxes.

You can add, remove, and reorder pedals. The signal flow runs from left to right in the Pedal area. The addition of two discrete busses, coupled with splitter and mixer units, enables you to experiment with sound design and precisely control the signal at any point in the signal chain.

All stompbox knobs, switches, and sliders can be automated. Eight Macro controls enable real time changes to any pedal parameter with a MIDI controller.

Figure. Pedalboard window, showing main interface areas.

Using Pedalboard’s Pedal Browser

Pedalboard offers dozens of pedal effects and utilities in the Pedal Browser on the right side of the interface. Each effect and utility is grouped into a category, such as distortion, modulation, and so on. For information about these types of stompboxes, see Distortion Pedals, Modulation Pedals, Delay Pedals, Filter Pedals, Dynamics Pedals, and Utility Pedals.

Figure. Pedal Browser, showing View pop-up menu and Import Mode button.
To hide or show the Pedal Browser
  • Click the disclosure triangle in the lower-right corner of the Pedal area.

To show only specific pedal groups in the Pedal Browser
  • Open the View pop-up menu and choose Distortion, Modulation, Delay, Filter, Dynamics, or Utility. The Pedal Browser shows only the stompboxes within the category you choose.

    To show all the pedal groups, choose Show All from the View pop-up menu.

To add a stompbox to the Pedal area
Do one of the following:
  • Drag the effect that you want to insert from the Pedal Browser to the appropriate Pedal area position. This can be to the left, to the right, or in-between existing pedals.

  • Double-click an effect in the Pedal Browser to add it to the right of all existing stompboxes in the Pedal area.

    Note: Double-clicking a stompbox in the Pedal Browser when a stompbox is selected in the Pedal area will replace the selected pedal.

Using Pedalboard’s Import Mode

Pedalboard has a feature you can use to import parameter settings for each type of pedal. In contrast to the plug-in window Settings menu, which you use to load a setting for the entire Pedalboard plug-in, this feature can be used to load a setting for a specific stompbox type.

Figure. Pedal Browser in import mode.
To activate or deactivate import mode
  • Click the Import Mode button to show all pedals used in the most recent Pedalboard setting. When the Import Mode button is active, the Pedal Browser switches to an alternate view mode that displays imported settings. When import mode is inactive, the normal Pedal Browser view is shown.

To import pedal settings into the Pedal Browser
  1. Click the Import Mode button to activate import mode. Note that the View menu changes to the Select Setting button.

    Note: If this is your first attempt to import settings, a dialog opens where you can select a setting to import.

  2. Click the Select Setting button and select a setting, then click Open. Dependent on the chosen setting, one or more stompboxes appear in the Pedal Browser. The name of the imported setting is shown at the bottom of the Pedal Browser.

To add an imported pedal to the Pedal area
Do one of the following:
  • Drag the stompbox that you want to add from the Pedal Browser to the appropriate Pedal area position. This can be to the left, to the right, or in-between existing pedals.

  • Ensure that no pedal is selected in the Pedal area, then double-click a stompbox in the Pedal Browser to add it to the right of all existing effects in the Pedal area.

    Note: The parameter settings of pedals added in import mode are also imported.

To replace a pedal setting in the Pedal area with an imported pedal setting
  1. Click the pedal you want to replace in the Pedal area. It becomes highlighted with a blue outline.

  2. Click the stompbox in the Pedal Browser to replace the selected pedal (or pedal setting) in the Pedal area. The blue outlines of the selected pedal in the Pedal area and Pedal Browser blink on and off to indicate an imported setting. The setting name area at the bottom of the Pedal Browser displays “Click selected item again to revert.”

    Note: If you want to make your replacement permanent, click the background in the Pedal Browser, or click the Import Mode button.

  3. To restore the selected pedal’s previous setting, click the highlighted stompbox in the Pedal Browser. The Import Mode button and the outline of the selected pedal (in the Pedal area) become solidly highlighted, indicating that the original setting has been restored.

Using Pedalboard’s Pedal Area

Pedalboard’s stompbox effect pedals not only resemble their physical counterparts; they are also used in much the same way—without the inconvenience of patch cords, power supplies, and screws or locking mechanisms. The Pedal area layout mirrors a traditional pedalboard, with signals running from left to right.

Figure. Pedal area, showing several stompboxes.
To add a pedal to the Pedal area
Do one of the following:
  • Drag the stompbox that you want to insert from the Pedal Browser to the appropriate Pedal area position. This can be to the left, to the right, or in-between existing pedals.

  • Ensure that no pedal is selected in the Pedal area, then double-click a stompbox in the Pedal Browser to add it to the right of all existing effects in the Pedal area.

    Note: You insert Mixer and Splitter utility pedals in a different way. See Using Pedalboard’s Routing Area.

To change an effect pedal position in the Pedal area
  • Drag the stompbox to a new position, either to the right or the left. Automation and bus routings, if active, are moved with the effect pedal. For information about automation and bus routings, see Using Pedalboard’s Routing Area.

    Note: There are two exceptions to the bus routing rule:  If the dragged pedal is the only pedal between a Splitter and Mixer utility, both utility pedals are automatically removed. If the second Bus (“B”) is not active at the destination, the pedal is inserted into Bus A.

To change a Mixer utility position in the Pedal area
  • Drag the Mixer utility to a new position, either to the left or the right.

    When moved to the left:  The “downmix” of Bus A and B will occur at the earlier insertion point. Relevant effect pedals are moved to the right and are inserted into Bus A.

    When moved to the right:  The “downmix” of Bus A and B will occur at the later insertion point. Relevant effect pedals are moved to the left and are inserted into Bus A.

    Note: A Mixer pedal cannot be moved to a position directly after (or to the left of) a corresponding split point or Splitter utility.

To change a Splitter utility position in the Pedal area
  • Drag the Splitter utility to a new position, either to the right or the left.

    When moved to the left:  The split between Bus A and B will occur at the earlier insertion point. Relevant effect pedals are moved to the right and are inserted into Bus A.

    When moved to the right:  The split between Bus A and B will occur at the later insertion point. Relevant effect pedals are moved to the left and are inserted into Bus A.

    Note: A Splitter pedal cannot be moved to a position directly preceding (or to the right of) a corresponding Mixer utility.

To replace a pedal in the Pedal area
Do one of the following:
  • Drag the stompbox from the Pedal Browser directly over the pedal you want to replace in the Pedal area.

  • Click to select the stompbox you want to replace in the Pedal area, then double-click the appropriate pedal in the Pedal Browser.

    Note: You can only replace “effect” pedals, not the Mixer or Splitter utilities. Bus routings, if active, are not changed when an effect pedal is replaced.

To remove a pedal from the Pedal area
Do one of the following:
  • Drag the pedal out of the Pedal area.

  • Click the pedal to select it and press the Delete key.

Using Pedalboard’s Routing Area

Pedalboard has two discrete signal buses—Bus A and Bus B—that are found in the Routing area above the Pedal area. These busses provide a great deal of flexibility when you are setting up signal processing chains. All stompboxes that you drag into the Pedal area are inserted into Bus A, by default.

Note: The Routing area appears when you move your pointer to a position immediately above the Pedal area, and it disappears when you move the pointer away. When you create a second bus routing, the Routing area remains open even when your pointer is not over it. You can close the Routing area by clicking the small latch button at the top, and then the Routing area will open or close automatically when you move your pointer over it.

Figure. Routing area of Pedalboard, showing two busses.
To create a second bus routing
Do one of the following:
  • Move your pointer immediately above the Pedal area to open the Routing area, and click the name of a stompbox in the Routing area. The pedal name moves upward, and the chosen stompbox is routed to Bus B. Two gray lines appear in the Routing area, which represent Bus A and Bus B. A Mixer utility pedal is automatically added to the end of the signal chain.

  • Drag a Splitter utility pedal into the Pedal area when more than one pedal is inserted. This also inserts a Mixer at the end of the signal chain if one doesn’t already exist.

To remove the second bus routing
Do one of the following:
  • Remove the Mixer and Splitter utility pedals from the Pedal area.

  • Remove all stompboxes from the Pedal area. This automatically removes an existing Mixer utility.

To remove an effect from the second bus
  • Click the name of the pedal (or on either of the gray lines) in the Routing area.

    Note: The removal of all effects from Bus B does not remove the second bus. The Mixer utility pedal remains in the Pedal area, even when a single stompbox (effect) is in the Pedal area. This allows parallel routing of wet and dry signals. Only when all pedal effects are removed from the Pedal area is the Mixer utility (and second bus) removed.

To determine the split point between busses
  • When more than one bus is active, a number of dots appear along the “cables” (gray lines) in the Routing area. These represent the output (the socket) of the pedal to the lower left of the dot. Click the appropriate dot to determine where the split point—where the signal is routed between busses. A cable appears between the busses when you click a dot.

    Note: You can not create a split point directly before, or after, the Mixer utility.

To switch between a Splitter utility and bus split point
  • Double-click a bus split point dot in the Routing area to replace it with a Splitter utility. The Splitter utility is shown in the Pedal area.

  • Double-click the Splitter label in the Routing area to replace the Splitter utility with a bus split point dot. The Splitter utility is removed from the Pedal area.

Notes on Splitter and Mixer Utility Use

Dragging a Splitter utility into the Pedal area automatically inserts a Mixer utility to the far right of all inserted pedals.

You cannot drag a Splitter utility to the far right of all inserted pedals, to directly after an inserted Splitter utility, to directly in front of an inserted Mixer utility, or to an empty space in the Pedal area.

Dragging a Mixer utility into the Pedal area automatically creates a split point at the earliest possible (the leftmost) point within the signal chain.

You cannot drag a Mixer utility to the first slot in the Pedal area, to between an inserted Splitter and Mixer utility combo, or directly to the right of an inserted Mixer utility.

Using Pedalboard’s Macro Controls Area

Pedalboard provides eight Macro Targets—A through H—which are found in the Macro Controls area below the Pedal area. These enable you to map any parameter of an inserted stompbox as a Macro A–H target. You can save different mappings with each Pedalboard setting.

In Logic Pro and MainStage, you use a controller assignment or create a Workspace knob for “Macro A–H Value.” MIDI hardware switches, sliders, or knobs can then be used to control the mapped Pedalboard Macro A–H target parameters in real time. See the Logic Pro User Manual or the MainStage User Manual for details.

Click the triangle at the bottom left to hide or show the Macro Controls area.

Note: The Macro Controls area is only available in Logic Pro and MainStage.

Figure. Macro target and value parameters of Pedalboard’s Macro Controls area.
  • Macro A–H Target pop-up menus: Determine the parameter that you want to control with a MIDI controller.
  • Macro A–H Value sliders and fields: Set, and display, the current value for the parameter chosen in the corresponding Macro Target pop-up menu.
To assign a Macro A–H Target
Do one of the following:
  • Click any of the Macro A–H Target pop-up menus, and choose the parameter that you want to control.

    Each stompbox parameter is shown in the following way:  “Slot number—Pedal Name—Parameter”. As examples:  “Slot 1—Blue Echo—Time”, or “Slot 2—Roswell Ringer—Feedback”. The “slot” number refers to the pedal position, as they appear from left to right in the Pedal area.

  • Choose the “-Auto assign-” item in any Macro A–H Target pop-up menu, then click the appropriate parameter in any inserted pedal.

    Note: The chosen parameter is displayed in the Macro A–H Target pop-up menu.

Distortion Pedals

This section describes the distortion effects pedals.

Stompbox
Description
Candy Fuzz
A bright, “nasty” distortion effect. Drive controls the input signal gain. Level sets the effect volume.
Double Dragon
A deluxe distortion effect. It offers independent level controls for input (Input) and output (Level). Drive controls the amount of saturation applied to the input signal. The Tone knob sets the cutoff frequency. The Squash knob sets the threshold for the internal compression circuit. Contour sets the amount of nonlinear distortion applied to the signal. Mix sets the ratio between the source and distorted signals. The Bright/Fat switch changes between two fixed high shelving filter frequencies. Blue and red LEDs indicate each switch position, respectively.
Fuzz Machine
An American “fuzz” distortion effect. Fuzz controls the input gain. Overall output gain is set with Level. The Tone knob increases treble, while simultaneously rolling-off low frequencies, as you move it to higher values.
Grinder
Grinder is a lo-fi, dirty “metal” distortion. Grind sets the amount of drive applied to the input signal. Tone is controlled with the Filter knob, making the sound harsher and more crunchy at higher values. The Full/Scoop switch alternates between two fixed Gain/Q filter settings. At the Full position, filtering is less pronounced than at the Scoop position. Overall output level is controlled with the Level knob.
Happy Face Fuzz
A softer, full-sounding distortion effect. Fuzz sets the amount of saturation applied to the input signal. Volume sets the output level.
Hi-Drive
An overdrive effect that can emphasize high frequency content in the signal. Level controls the effect output. The Treble/Full switch sets a fixed shelving frequency, allowing either the treble portion or the full range input signal to be processed.
Monster Fuzz
A saturated, somewhat harsh distortion. Roar sets the amount of gain applied to the input signal. Growl sets the amount of saturation. Tone sets the overall color of the distortion. Higher Tone values increase the treble content of the signal, but there is a corresponding decrease in overall volume. Texture can smooth out or roughen up the distortion. Grain sets the amount of nonlinear distortion applied to the signal. The effect output is controlled with the Level knob.
Octafuzz
A fat fuzz effect, that can deliver a soft, saturated distortion. Fuzz controls the input gain. Level sets the ratio between the distorted and source signals. The Tone knob sets the cutoff frequency of the highpass filter.
Rawk! Distortion
A metal/hard rock distortion effect. Crunch sets the amount of saturation applied to the input signal. Output gain is set with Level. Tonal color is set with the Tone knob, making the sound brighter at higher values.
Vintage Drive
Overdrive effect that emulates the distortion produced by a field effect transistor (FET), which is commonly used in solid-state amplifiers. When saturated, FETs generate a warmer sounding distortion than bipolar transistors (such as those emulated by Grinder). Drive sets the saturation amount for the input signal. Tone sets the frequency for the high cut filter, resulting in a softer or harsher tone. The Fat switch, when at the top position, enhances lower frequency content in the signal. Level sets the overall output level of the effect.

Modulation Pedals

This section describes the modulation effects pedals.

Stompbox
Description
Heavenly Chorus
A rich, sweet-sounding chorus effect that can significantly thicken the sound. Rate sets the modulation speed and can run freely, or be synchronized with the host application tempo by enabling the Sync button. When synchronized, you can specify bar, beat and note values (including triplets and dotted notes). Depth sets the strength of the effect. Feedback sends the output of the effect back in to the input, further thickening the sound, or leading to intermodulations. Delay sets the ratio between the original and effect signals. The upper Bright switch position applies a fixed frequency internal EQ to the signal. At the bottom position, the EQ is bypassed.
Phase Tripper
A simple phasing effect. Rate sets the modulation speed and can run freely, or be synchronized with the host application tempo by enabling the Sync button. When synchronized, you can specify bar, beat and note values (including triplets and dotted notes). Depth sets the strength of the effect. Feedback determines the amount of the effect signal that is routed back into the input. This can change the tonal color, can make the sweeping effect more pronounced, or can do both.
Phaze 2
A very flexible dual-phaser effect. LFO 1 and LFO2 Rate sets the modulation speed and can run freely, or be synchronized with the host application tempo by enabling the Sync button. Ceiling and Floor determine the frequency range that is swept. Order switches between different algorithms, with higher (even) numbers resulting in a heavier phasing effect. Odd order numbers result in more subtle comb-filtering effects. Feedback determines the amount of the effect signal that is routed back into the input. This can change the tonal color, can make the phasing effect more pronounced, or can do both. Tone works from the center position; turn it to the left to increase the amount of lowpass filtering, or turn it to the right to increase the amount of highpass filtering. Mix sets the level ratio between each phaser.
Retro Chorus
A subtle, vintage chorus effect. Rate sets the modulation speed and can run freely, or be synchronized with the host application tempo by enabling the Sync button. When synchronized, you can specify bar, beat and note values (including triplets and dotted notes). Depth sets the strength of the effect.
Robo Flanger
Flexible flanging effect. Rate sets the modulation speed and can run freely, or be synchronized with the host application tempo by enabling the Sync button. When synchronized, you can specify bar, beat and note values (including triplets and dotted notes). Depth sets the strength of the effect. Feedback determines the amount of the effect signal that is routed back into the input. This can change the tonal color, can make the flanging effect more pronounced, or can do both. The Manual knob sets a delay time between the source and effect signals. This can result in flanger-chorus effects, or in metallic-sounding modulations, particularly when used with high Feedback values.
Roswell Ringer
A ring modulation effect that can make incoming audio sound metallic (or unrecognizable), can deliver tremolos, brighten up signals and more. The Freq knob sets the core filter cutoff frequency. Fine is a fine tuning knob for the filter frequency. The Lin/Exp switch determines if the frequency curve is linear (12 notes per octave) or exponential. FB (feedback) determines the amount of the effect signal that is routed back into the input. This can change the tonal color, can make the effect more pronounced, or can do both. Balance between the original and effect signals is set with the Mix knob. See Ringshifter for background information on ring modulation.
Roto Phase
A phaser effect that adds movement to, and alters the phase of, the signal. Rate sets the modulation speed and can run freely, or be synchronized with the host application tempo by enabling the Sync button. When synchronized, you can specify bar, beat and note values (including triplets and dotted notes) with the Rate knob. Intensity sets the strength of the effect. The Vintage/Modern switch activates a fixed-frequency internal EQ when switched to Vintage, and deactivates it when switched to Modern.
Spin Box
Emulation of a Leslie rotor speaker cabinet, commonly used with the Hammond B3 organ. Cabinet sets the type of speaker box. Fast Rate sets the maximum modulation speed (only applies when Fast button is active). Response determines the amount of time required for the rotor to reach its maximum and minimum speed. Drive increases the input gain, introducing distortion to the signal. The Bright switch activates a high shelving filter when turned on. The Slow, Brake and Fast buttons determine how the “speaker” behaves:  Slow rotates the speaker slowly. Fast rotates the speaker quickly (up to the maximum speed determined by the Fast Rate knob). Brake stops the speaker rotation. See Rotor Cabinet Effect for background information on the Leslie effect.
Total Tremolo
A flexible tremolo effect (modulation of the signal level). Rate sets the modulation speed and can run freely, or be synchronized with the host application tempo by enabling the Sync button. When synchronized, you can specify bar, beat and note values (including triplets and dotted notes). Depth sets the strength of the effect. Wave and Smooth work in combination to alter the waveform shape of the LFO. This enables you to create floating changes in level, or abrupt steps. Volume determines the output level of the effect. The 1/2 and 2 x  Speed buttons immediately halve or double the current Rate value. Hold down the Speed Up and Slow Down buttons to gradually accelerate or reduce the current Rate value to the maximum or minimum possible values.
Trem-o-Tone
A tremolo effect (modulation of the signal level). Rate sets the modulation speed and can run freely, or be synchronized with the host application tempo by enabling the Sync button. When synchronized, you can specify bar, beat and note values (including triplets and dotted notes). Depth sets the strength of the effect. Level sets the post-tremolo gain.
the Vibe
A vibrato/chorus effect based on the Scanner Vibrato unit found in the Hammond B3 organ. You can choose from three vibrato (V1–3) or chorus (C1–3) variations with the Type knob. Rate sets the modulation speed and can run freely, or be synchronized with the host application tempo by enabling the Sync button. When synchronized, you can specify bar, beat and note values (including triplets and dotted notes). Depth sets the strength of the effect. See Scanner Vibrato Effect for background information on this effect.

Delay Pedals

This section describes the Delay effects pedals.

Stompbox
Description
Blue Echo
A delay effect. Time sets the modulation speed and can run freely, or be synchronized with the host application tempo by enabling the Sync button. When synchronized, you can specify bar, beat and note values (including triplets and dotted notes). The Repeats knob determines the number of delay repeats. Mix sets the balance between the delayed and source signals. The Tone Cut switch controls a fixed frequency internal filter circuit that allows more low (Lo) or high (Hi) frequency content to be heard. You can also disable this filter circuit by choosing Off.
Spring Box
A spring reverb pedal. Time sets the length of the reverberation to short, medium, or long values. Tone controls the cutoff frequency, making the effect brighter or darker. Style switches between algorithms, each with different characteristics. You can choose from:  Boutique, Simple, Vintage, Bright, and Resonant. Mix sets the ratio between the source and effect signals.
Tru-Tape Delay
A vintage tape delay effect. The Norm/Reverse switch changes the delay playback direction. Reverse mode is indicated by a blue LED and Normal mode is indicated by a red LED. Hi Cut and Lo Cut activate a fixed frequency filter. Dirt sets the amount of input signal gain, which can introduce an overdriven, saturated quality. Flutter emulates speed fluctuations in the tape transport mechanism. Time sets the modulation speed and can run freely, or be synchronized with the host application tempo by enabling the Sync button. When synchronized, you can specify bar, beat and note values (including triplets and dotted notes). Feedback determines the amount of the effect signal that is routed back into the input. The buildup of repeating signals can be used creatively for dub-delay and other effects by adjusting Feedback in real time. Mix sets the balance between the source and effect signals.

Filter Pedals

This section describes the filter effects pedals.

Stompbox
Description
Auto-Funk
An auto-wah (filter) effect. Sensitivity sets a threshold which determines how the filter responds to incoming signal levels. Cutoff sets the center frequency for the filter. The BP/LP switch enables either a bandpass or lowpass filter circuit. Signal frequencies just above and below the cutoff point are filtered when the BP switch position is chosen. When the LP switch position is active, only signals below the cutoff point are allowed through the filter. The Hi/Lo switch chooses one of two preset (filter) resonance settings. The Up/Down switch activates a positive or negative modulation direction (the “wah” filtering occurs above or below the source signal frequency).
Classic Wah
A funky wah effect, straight from 1970’s TV police show soundtracks. You control it by dragging the pedal.
Modern Wah
A more aggressive wah effect. You control it by dragging the pedal. Mode enables you to choose from the following:  Retro Wah, Modern Wah, Opto Wah 1, Opto Wah 2, Volume. Each has a different tonal quality. The Q knob determines the resonant characteristics. Low Q values affect a wider frequency range, resulting in softer resonances. High Q values affect a narrower frequency range, resulting in more pronounced emphasis.

Dynamics Pedals

This section describes the dynamics pedals.

Stompbox
Description
Squash Compressor
A simple compressor. Sustain sets the threshold level. Signals above this are reduced in level. Level determines the output gain. The Attack switch can be set to Fast for signals with fast attack transients, such as drums, or to Slow for signals with slow attack phases, such as strings.

Utility Pedals

This section describes the parameters of the Mixer and Splitter pedals.

Stompbox
Description
Mixer
A utility that is used to control the level relationship between Bus A and Bus B signals. It can be inserted anywhere in the signal chain, but is typically used at the end of the chain (at the extreme right of the Pedal area). See Using Pedalboard’s Routing Area for details on use. The A/Mix/B switch solos the “A” signal, mixes the “A” and “B” signals, or solos the “B” signal. The level setting of the Mix fader is relevant for all A/Mix/B switch positions.
In stereo instances, the Mixer utility also provides discrete Pan controls for each bus.
Splitter
A utility that can be inserted anywhere in the signal chain. Splitter can be used in two ways;
When set to Freq, it works as a frequency-dependent signal splitter that divides the incoming signal. Signals above the frequency set with the Frequency knob are sent to Bus B. Signals below this frequency are sent to Bus A.
When set to Split, the incoming signal is routed equally to both buses. The Frequency knob has no impact in this mode.
See Using Pedalboard’s Routing Area for details on use.